WEATHER AUTHORITY : Flash Flood Watch - Flood Advisory - Flash Flood Warning View Alerts

Mississippi defends 15-week abortion ban in appeals court

A federal court that rejected Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban should have let the state present evidence about whether a fetus experiences pain, an attorney for the state argued Monday.

Posted: Oct 7, 2019 5:48 PM

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal court that rejected Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban should have let the state present evidence about whether a fetus experiences pain, an attorney for the state argued Monday.

But a lawyer for Mississippi's only abortion clinic said the Supreme Court has been clear that a woman has a right to have an abortion before the fetus is viable.

The arguments came during a hearing at the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on a Mississippi law that would ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. It's one of many laws pushed by conservative states in recent years, aimed at trying to persuade the increasingly conservative Supreme Court to further restrict the amount of time when abortion is legally available, or even to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision.

That decision said women have the right to terminate pregnancies until viability, when a fetus can survive outside the womb.

After Republican Gov. Phil Bryant signed Mississippi's law in 2018, the Jackson Women's Health Organization immediately sued. U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves blocked the law from taking effect, writing that it "unequivocally" violates women's constitutional rights because it bans abortion weeks before viability.

Reeves wrote that viability must be determined by trained medical professionals, and the "established medical consensus" is that viability typically begins at 23 to 24 weeks after the pregnant woman's last menstrual period.

Mississippi and its supporters appealed to the 5th Circuit. Mississippi contends that Reeves overstepped his authority by only considering the case through the prism of viability.

"From that point on the outcome of this case was preordained," Paul Barnes, a special assistant attorney general, told the three-judge panel.

Barnes also suggested the 15-week standard had little effect on the Jackson clinic because they already refuse to perform abortions after 16 weeks.

"It is a prohibition for one week," Barnes said.

Hillary Schneller, a lawyer from the Center for Reproductive Rights which is representing the clinic, argued that the Supreme Court has been clear through decades of case law about a woman's right to an abortion before fetal viability.

"There is no dispute that 15 weeks is well before viability," she said.

At least one of the 5th Circuit judges seemed skeptical that viability should be the only standard. James C. Ho repeatedly asked whether a fetus feeling pain could ever be a factor in determining whether an abortion can be carried out. At one point, he asked if pain is "irrelevant."

Ho also questioned why discussion of the fetal pain question wasn't permitted during the lower court's proceedings.

"Where would we get that factual evidence if not at trial?" he asked.

The other justices — Patrick E. Higginbotham and James L. Dennis — asked few or no questions. Ho was nominated by President Donald Trump in 2017, Higginbotham by President Ronald Reagan in 1982 and Dennis by President Bill Clinton in 1995.

The 5th Circuit handles cases from Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, and it's generally considered one of the most conservative appeals courts in the U.S.

Louisiana passed a 15-week abortion ban in 2018, but it takes effect only if the appeals court upholds the Mississippi law.

Even as the court fight continues over the 15-week ban, Mississippi lawmakers passed another law this year banning most abortions at about six weeks, when fetal cardiac activity can be detected. Reeves also blocked that law, saying it "smacks of defiance to this court." Attorneys are filing separate arguments about it to the 5th Circuit. The hearing Monday did not reference the 6-week ban.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 473413

Reported Deaths: 9214
CountyCasesDeaths
Harrison32339474
Hinds30703575
DeSoto29814346
Jackson23263336
Rankin21111358
Lee14600217
Madison14043265
Jones13165218
Forrest12953233
Lauderdale11418297
Lowndes10249175
Lamar10048128
Pearl River8737209
Lafayette8078136
Hancock7324111
Washington6837147
Oktibbeha6820118
Neshoba6404201
Monroe6372158
Warren6326161
Pontotoc610393
Panola6071124
Bolivar6016143
Marshall5972118
Union564086
Pike5491133
Lincoln5232130
Alcorn520888
George457868
Scott451993
Leflore4401140
Prentiss437276
Itawamba436198
Tippah436180
Simpson4268111
Copiah425586
Wayne424863
Tate4234100
Adams4219114
Yazoo415886
Sunflower4088104
Covington407391
Marion4032100
Leake393185
Coahoma388198
Newton364474
Grenada3517101
Stone345657
Tishomingo324888
Attala321185
Jasper310262
Winston300391
Clay288273
Chickasaw282164
Clarke277487
Calhoun259739
Holmes259485
Smith243947
Yalobusha216747
Tallahatchie215649
Walthall205557
Greene204045
Lawrence203831
Perry196453
Amite193751
Webster191941
Noxubee174538
Montgomery169853
Jefferson Davis165541
Carroll159937
Tunica148434
Benton139433
Kemper137439
Claiborne125634
Choctaw124925
Humphreys123337
Franklin115227
Quitman101825
Wilkinson99835
Jefferson86632
Sharkey62120
Issaquena1916
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 764839

Reported Deaths: 13048
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson1089971721
Mobile698041173
Madison48181574
Baldwin35619445
Shelby35053289
Tuscaloosa32903508
Montgomery32475655
Lee21787203
Calhoun19941374
Morgan19234315
Etowah18509422
Marshall17217258
Houston16028347
St. Clair14866275
Limestone14059179
Elmore13943241
Cullman13942234
Lauderdale13030266
Talladega12307211
DeKalb11829226
Walker10171306
Autauga9439124
Blount9357149
Jackson9055136
Coffee8625157
Colbert8287164
Dale8241151
Escambia6436103
Tallapoosa6353166
Covington6291154
Chilton6215129
Russell590154
Franklin561294
Chambers5211130
Dallas4610176
Marion4579114
Clarke449471
Pike448289
Geneva4223102
Winston404685
Lawrence4040101
Bibb394776
Barbour337067
Marengo319979
Monroe310346
Butler308483
Pickens298369
Randolph291655
Henry291455
Hale285281
Cherokee278249
Fayette270671
Washington242645
Crenshaw231664
Clay220761
Macon213254
Cleburne208746
Lamar186339
Conecuh176538
Lowndes168756
Coosa162531
Wilcox153934
Bullock146842
Perry134035
Sumter122935
Greene118541
Choctaw72225
Out of AL00
Unassigned00
Tupelo
Cloudy
73° wxIcon
Hi: 86° Lo: 73°
Feels Like: 73°
Columbus
Cloudy
73° wxIcon
Hi: 83° Lo: 73°
Feels Like: 73°
Oxford
Mostly Cloudy
68° wxIcon
Hi: 81° Lo: 70°
Feels Like: 68°
Starkville
Mostly Cloudy
73° wxIcon
Hi: 84° Lo: 74°
Feels Like: 73°
Occasional areas of rain and some scattered thunderstorms will be in store for most of the weekend. However, good news by later sections of next week, as cooler and drier air will work its way into our weather forecast.
WTVA Radar
WTVA Temperatures
WTVA Severe Weather