Qatar's Ras Abu Aboud stadium is the first built in World Cup history that was meant to be torn down

Qatar's Ras Abu Aboud stadium is the first built in World Cup history that was meant to be torn down

Posted: Jul 18, 2021 7:21 AM
Updated: Jul 18, 2021 7:21 AM

It was once a quiet waterfront, only enjoying the occasional sounds from the nearby Gulf shores. Now, it's a dizzying burst of color and life -- soon to be filled with up to 40,000 screaming fans.

It is Qatar's Ras Abu Aboud stadium -- the first built in World Cup history that was meant to be torn down.

Molded out of 974 shipping containers atop Doha's port, the Ras Abu Aboud will host seven matches up to the quarterfinals of the 2022 World Cup.

All the containers are made from recycled steel, and the number -- 974 -- symbolizes Qatar's dialing code.

It's both a symbol of the country's sustainability pledge and a reflection of its identity.

After the tournament is over, many parts of the arena -- including all the removable seats, containers and even the roof -- will be dismantled and repurposed for use in other sporting or non-sporting events, either inside or outside of Qatar.

"The 40,000-seater venue can be dismantled in full and transported to be built again in a different country; or you could build two 20,000-seater venues," Mohammed Al Atwan, project manager for Ras Abu Aboud told CNN.

"Really, all parts can be donated to countries in need of sporting infrastructure. This is the beauty of the stadium -- the legacy opportunities are endless."

Along with the opportunities he says it offers, Qatar is hoping the stadium will be a trailblazer for future football tournaments.

READ: World Cup 2022: Qatar is ready as it strongly contests accusations of workers' rights abuses

Sustainability challenge

A FIFA report in June estimated the 2022 World Cup to produce up to 3.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide, that's 1.5 million tonnes of CO2 more than the 2018 tournament in Russia created.

Nonetheless, the Gulf state is committed to delivering a carbon-neutral World Cup through offsetting emissions -- before, during and after the event.

Organizers have promised sustainable building methods during the construction of the tournament's infrastructure, such as the Ras Abu Abboud stadium, adding that they have procured "building materials that maximize resource efficiency and reduce emissions, waste and impacts on biodiversity."

READ: Euro 2020: Azzurri's victory over England caps Italian football's 'renaissance'

The SC says it is committed to keeping sustainability a main focus throughout the tournament -- an example of this is planting trees and plants around the World Cup's infrastructure to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

The onus, however, isn't just on the organizers. Qatar says it will give recommendations to attendees and participants of the tournament on how they can reduce their own greenhouse gas emissions, including from travel, accommodation and food and beverage.

Once the spectacle is over, Qatar says it will offset any emissions generated during the tournament through building two mega solar power plants over the following 10-15 years, and by proactively supporting sustainable and low-carbon events in Qatar and the region

The reusability of the stadium's parts is a reflection of that effort.

"Sustainability and legacy have always been at the forefront of Qatar's planning and preparations for the World Cup,' said Al Atwan.

When coming up with the stadium's design, Al Atwan said movability was the main consideration for choosing shipping containers as the building blocks.

Containers are designed to be transported, either by air or sea, but when joined together to form a whole, they transform into a sturdy structure.

That ended up reducing the waste created on site during construction, says Al Atwan, adding that the Ras Abu Aboud Stadium has set a benchmark for sustainable and green mega-sporting event infrastructure.

Unlike the other seven Qatar 2022 venues, Ras Abu Aboud's temporary nature meant that fewer building materials were required, keeping construction costs down and shortening the time needed to complete it.

Construction on the 4.8 million square feet (450,000 square meters) site commenced in late 2017 and is scheduled for completion by the end of this year, according to organizers.

Cooling sea breeze

When a fan steps outside Ras Abu Aboud, they're met by Doha's West Bay skyline. So when the sun goes down, a symphony of color -- exchanged between the shimmering skyscrapers on one side and the stadium on the other -- reflects off the shores and lights up the city.

And that proximity to the water doesn't only offer attractive views.

All of Qatar's World Cup stadiums are equipped with highly efficient cooling systems that maintain a comfortable atmosphere regardless of the hot temperatures outside.

But Ras Abu Aboud doesn't need one because it gets a natural cool breeze from the sea nearby.

"Post-2022, the redevelopment of the site could take many forms and its legacy plans are still being finalized. It could be redeveloped into a public green space or used for a mix of commercial and residential projects," said Al Atwan.

"It's prime location means it's suited to many projects and has an exciting future," he added.

That future is not only physical, Al Atawan tells CNN. "Mega-sporting events like the FIFA World Cup have the power to inspire, prompt innovation and push existing boundaries to achieve new levels of success."

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 482902

Reported Deaths: 9425
CountyCasesDeaths
Harrison33063488
Hinds31021589
DeSoto30610358
Jackson23687348
Rankin21340370
Lee14909220
Madison14166271
Jones13404227
Forrest13160240
Lauderdale11601305
Lowndes10443176
Lamar10214130
Pearl River9098221
Lafayette8241137
Hancock7514112
Washington7102150
Oktibbeha6964124
Monroe6514164
Neshoba6475201
Warren6464164
Pontotoc630393
Panola6250126
Marshall6126123
Bolivar6115144
Union574186
Pike5613136
Alcorn537290
Lincoln5303131
George471472
Scott459196
Leflore4476140
Prentiss446779
Tippah446480
Itawamba4444100
Adams4416116
Tate4394101
Simpson4335112
Wayne433066
Copiah431787
Yazoo423386
Covington415792
Sunflower4148104
Marion4099104
Leake397586
Coahoma3957100
Newton370875
Grenada3556104
Stone350860
Tishomingo336289
Attala325387
Jasper314162
Winston304691
Clay296473
Chickasaw287065
Clarke282190
Calhoun266141
Holmes262187
Smith250649
Yalobusha221047
Tallahatchie220450
Walthall211058
Greene209045
Lawrence206833
Perry199953
Amite198452
Webster196542
Noxubee178939
Montgomery172454
Jefferson Davis168342
Carroll162137
Tunica153334
Benton142535
Kemper138640
Choctaw127026
Claiborne126834
Humphreys126637
Franklin116728
Quitman103926
Wilkinson101936
Jefferson91333
Sharkey63020
Issaquena1926
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 787421

Reported Deaths: 14022
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson1114521765
Mobile708161234
Madison49744633
Baldwin36201495
Shelby36186315
Tuscaloosa33818548
Montgomery33135678
Lee22590220
Calhoun21140410
Morgan19795335
Etowah19188462
Marshall17659274
Houston16788386
St. Clair15408305
Cullman14568258
Limestone14553188
Elmore14444264
Lauderdale13486281
Talladega12932236
DeKalb12174237
Walker10561330
Blount9693157
Autauga9652137
Jackson9363158
Coffee8847175
Dale8584173
Colbert8508184
Tallapoosa6661181
Escambia6585121
Covington6432167
Chilton6372144
Russell605355
Franklin5779101
Chambers5398134
Marion4789120
Dallas4694189
Clarke462279
Pike461597
Geneva4396117
Winston425295
Lawrence4112108
Bibb408581
Barbour346570
Marengo326285
Butler318190
Monroe318153
Randolph305256
Pickens304474
Henry301358
Hale292285
Cherokee289455
Fayette279073
Washington245248
Crenshaw237970
Cleburne235251
Clay228365
Macon219258
Lamar196243
Conecuh181846
Lowndes170758
Coosa169935
Wilcox159736
Bullock149243
Perry136437
Sumter124436
Greene121243
Choctaw73427
Out of AL00
Unassigned00
Tupelo
Clear
63° wxIcon
Hi: 84° Lo: 58°
Feels Like: 63°
Columbus
Partly Cloudy
60° wxIcon
Hi: 85° Lo: 55°
Feels Like: 60°
Oxford
Clear
59° wxIcon
Hi: 82° Lo: 55°
Feels Like: 59°
Starkville
Partly Cloudy
60° wxIcon
Hi: 84° Lo: 56°
Feels Like: 60°
While some cool mornings are again in store for the weekend, afternoons start to warm up a bit, so plan on dressing in layers if you're heading to the MSU or Bama games, because you'll need to utilize them in different ways.
WTVA Radar
WTVA Temperatures
WTVA Severe Weather