What to expect at Wednesday's Democratic presidential debate

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Michael Bloomberg has qualified for the Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas, paving the way for the former New York mayor's first appearance on stage with his 2020 rivals.

Posted: Feb 19, 2020 12:13 PM
Updated: Feb 19, 2020 12:13 PM

The best presidential primary debates have conflict and clash. The candidates participating in the ninth Democratic debate, happening Wednesday night in Las Vegas, look ready to level attacks on each other's policies and past positions. Good.

On issues ranging from health care to immigration, a vigorous debate would help Nevada Democrats determine whose plans can withstand scrutiny and whose will crumble under questioning. While some underdogs have become strong nomination contenders, others have faced harsh scrutiny -- and still others are largely a mystery to debate-watchers. How each debater performs Wednesday night could have a large impact on their campaign's trajectory.

For starters, Sen. Bernie Sanders, and his signature Medicare for All proposal, have a sizable and loyal following. But what happened in Nevada recently is a reminder that many Democrats oppose making private health insurance illegal.

The Culinary Union Local 226 represents 60,000 workers and is the most powerful union in Nevada. It also runs the Culinary Health Fund, which provides health benefits for members and their families. The union is strongly opposed to Medicare for All. It distributed a flyer recently stating that Sanders would "end Culinary healthcare."

An endorsement from Culinary 226 could have pushed a non-Bernie alternative to victory in Nevada. It declined to endorse anyone, however. Expect several candidates to tout their desire to defend union health care in an effort to appeal to undecided union members.

There's another wrinkle here, too: After Culinary 226 put out its fact sheet, Sanders supporters sent a barrage of vulgar insults to two of the union's top female leaders. Sanders denounced those attacks in a later interview on PBS, but former Vice President Joe Biden suggested Sanders bears "some accountability." Biden said that if his supporters had done that, he would "flat disown them." This could be a fruitful line of attack for Biden or another candidate to pursue during the debate.

For the Nevada debate, the Democratic National Committee scrapped the requirement to have a certain number of donors. That means the self-funded former New York Mayor and presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg is qualified to take the stage.

It will be worth watching how candidates engage with the billionaire's presidential bid. He isn't on the ballot in Nevada, but the other candidates have reason to go after him. The hundreds of millions of dollars he's poured into ads boosted him to third place in last week's Quinnipiac poll.

Bloomberg will be the perfect foil for Sen. Elizabeth Warren. She's frequently attacked banking institutions and has proposed a wealth tax. Expect her to ratchet up her attacks on Bloomberg for previously linking the 2008 financial crisis, in part, to a decline in "redlining," a practice in which banks didn't make loans in certain areas. Often those areas had a high minority population. Warren is currently fourth in the Quinnipiac poll so she has nothing to lose by using class warfare and issues of race to energize potential supporters.

Nevada, which holds its Democratic caucus February 22, is the first voting state with a sizable minority population. That gives candidates another line of attack on Bloomberg. He previously defended the use of "stop and frisk" as a crime-fighting tactic. In 2016, he said that "male, minorities, 16 to 25" made up the majority of violent criminals.

Comments like these give a candidate such as Pete Buttigieg an easy opening to try to ingratiate himself with minority voters. The former South Bend, Indiana, mayor has struggled to earn support from minority communities, which may have contributed to him polling poorly in Nevada.

Nevada has a large Hispanic population, so expect caucusgoers to key in on candidates' answers about immigration. With her surprising third-place finish in New Hampshire, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota touts herself as a moderate alternative to President Donald Trump. Being a moderate means she's held positions that don't always play well during a Democratic primary (for example, she once voted for building 370 miles of border fencing and increasing the number of Border Patrol agents). If other candidates think she has momentum, expect them to use that against her.

The last thing to note is that Nevada Democrats offer early caucus voting through Tuesday. Yes, that's as odd as it sounds. As of Monday morning, the Nevada State Democratic Party reported that more than 26,000 Democrats had voted early. In 2016, around 84,000 Democrats voted in the Nevada caucus, so a sizable number of voters will have voted before Wednesday's debate. Even if a candidate has a breakout performance Wednesday night, early voting will limit their surge, because there will be fewer caucusgoers left.

Almost every candidate coming to Nevada has a reason to be aggressive, which should make for one of the most informative and interesting debates yet.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 149940

Reported Deaths: 3779
CountyCasesDeaths
DeSoto9953104
Hinds9892198
Harrison7045110
Jackson6270119
Rankin5462102
Lee501095
Madison4734106
Forrest380586
Jones354888
Lauderdale3425145
Lafayette321549
Washington3161107
Lamar289250
Oktibbeha244362
Bolivar240984
Lowndes234164
Panola219850
Neshoba2196118
Marshall213850
Leflore204790
Pontotoc199228
Monroe197377
Sunflower191655
Lincoln188765
Warren175357
Tate168051
Union166025
Copiah163040
Pike161658
Yazoo154239
Scott152129
Itawamba151534
Pearl River150867
Coahoma150143
Alcorn149628
Simpson146753
Prentiss144230
Adams141150
Grenada140645
Leake133543
Holmes129961
George124524
Tippah124530
Covington122238
Winston121624
Hancock120239
Wayne117223
Marion115846
Attala112234
Tishomingo108942
Chickasaw107132
Newton104229
Tallahatchie96827
Clay90327
Clarke89353
Jasper82022
Walthall76328
Stone76114
Calhoun73913
Montgomery73625
Carroll72115
Lawrence70814
Noxubee70617
Yalobusha70627
Smith70516
Perry66126
Tunica60619
Greene60022
Claiborne58316
Jefferson Davis56517
Amite53114
Humphreys53119
Benton49117
Quitman4897
Webster43414
Kemper42518
Wilkinson39422
Jefferson34811
Franklin3365
Choctaw3237
Sharkey30917
Issaquena1144
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 242874

Reported Deaths: 3572
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson31944500
Mobile19687361
Madison13065148
Tuscaloosa12983154
Montgomery12286236
Shelby1020377
Baldwin860398
Lee773566
Morgan653850
Calhoun6240119
Marshall621355
Etowah621066
Houston523038
DeKalb481336
Cullman435442
Limestone420645
St. Clair415855
Elmore404564
Lauderdale400454
Walker3634111
Talladega349054
Jackson313423
Colbert309342
Blount288840
Autauga271642
Franklin251033
Coffee242615
Dale231854
Dallas225932
Chilton221938
Russell22143
Covington218534
Escambia197931
Chambers176550
Tallapoosa175791
Pike158314
Clarke158019
Marion137936
Winston132323
Lawrence127336
Pickens122318
Geneva12138
Marengo121024
Bibb117317
Barbour117110
Butler115341
Randolph102021
Cherokee101524
Hale96131
Clay91124
Washington90919
Fayette89816
Henry8526
Lowndes79529
Monroe78711
Cleburne77114
Macon73122
Crenshaw71130
Bullock69419
Conecuh68414
Perry6846
Lamar6718
Wilcox63218
Sumter57722
Greene42418
Choctaw42113
Coosa3414
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