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Barr is following the Trump playbook: Deny, deny, deny

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During questioning by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), Attorney General William Barr stood by using "spying" to describe President Trump's 2016 campaign.

Posted: May 2, 2019 12:00 AM
Updated: May 2, 2019 12:00 AM

Asked about his claim that he didn't know what special counsel Robert Mueller -- supposedly a long-time friend -- thought of his handling of the Mueller report's key findings, Attorney General William Barr would not admit any wrongdoing and correct the record. Instead, he followed the President Donald Trump playbook, offering spin and evasion like a man desperate to avoid accountability.

The issue is easy to grasp. On April 9, after Mueller wrote to voice his unease over the four-page summary that Barr issued, Barr was asked if he knew how the special counsel's team felt about his conclusions. "No, I don't," said Barr. When asked about this lie during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday, he responded: "I talked directly to Bob Mueller, not members of his team," said Barr, suggesting he and Mueller were not in disagreement.

This reply ignored that, in Mueller's letter, he had expressed concern that Barr's handling of the report had contributed to "public confusion" and threatened to "undermine" the purpose of his work. Barr's evasiveness prompted Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse to admire his "masterful hairsplitting."

Things didn't get better from there. Barr explained that when he used the inflammatory word "spying" to describe federal probes of the Trump campaign, he wasn't suggesting anything untoward. "I don't think the word 'spying' has any pejorative connotation at all," he said.

The important thing to notice is not just the specific distortions of fact here, but also that a 68-year-old man with a lifelong record as a respected attorney and public official would make this performance the capstone of his career. Seemingly, Barr didn't become attorney general in order to commit reputational suicide. However, this fate was all but guaranteed when he aligned himself with a President who knows how to exploit the darker side of human nature.

Everyone has a dark side. It's the part of us that feels jealousy and hatred, that fantasizes about revenge. Maturity allows us to see that this shadow exists; morality prevents us from indulging it. The President, who has misled the public more than 10,000 times, according to the Washington Post, is neither mature nor moral. He gives his dark side free rein and looks for others to recruit into his schemes. Those who join in, like the soon-to-be-imprisoned former attorney Michael Cohen or current federal inmate Paul Manafort, do so at enormous risk.

Barr revealed his shadow self in 2018 when, as a private citizen, he sent the Justice Department a 19-page memo attacking Mueller's obstruction inquiry. A commonsense reading of this unsolicited document leads to the obvious conclusion that Barr was angling for the job of attorney general -- by promising, indirectly, that he would be the President's defender.

This is not a conventional view of the attorney general's role, but it surely appealed to a President who has repeatedly said he needed an attorney general in the mold of the shadowy Roy Cohn, who was disbarred on charges of "dishonesty, fraud, deceit and misrepresentation," to protect him. (Cohn never served as attorney general, but he was Trump's lawyer and mentor -- and shaped the President's views on the role that lawyers should play.)

And it turns out, Trump made the right choice. After Barr issued his four-page summary -- stating that Mueller had not found sufficient evidence of any Trump campaign official conspiring with the Russians and that Barr had decided Trump had not obstructed justice -- Trump claimed "complete and total exoneration."

This storyline dominated public discourse until the actual report was published and revealed a far more nuanced understanding of both charges. Still, on the day the report was published, Barr held a press conference, where he peddled the same misleading arguments about Trump's innocence in all matters -- despite the blatant discrepancies between his summary and the full version of the report.

Barr now joins a host of people who have been forced by the President to make character-revealing choices. Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, according to the Mueller report, chose to lie regarding the circumstances surrounding the firing of former FBI Director James Comey. (She claims it was a slip of the tongue.) And what little was left of her credibility has now largely been lost.

Then there is Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the President, who has made such outrageous claims about the existence of "alternative facts," that she, too, has lost much of her credibility.

Sanders and Conway are so far down the path of deceit in the service of Trump that one can't imagine them turning around, copping to what they have done and choosing another straighter path.

But Barr had the option to take a different route. Other men at the end of their careers, like former Secretary of Defense James Mattis and former Chief of Staff John Kelly saw what was at stake and, with their resignations, walked away. Barr didn't heed their example -- and instead followed the President.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 313942

Reported Deaths: 7240
CountyCasesDeaths
DeSoto21580258
Hinds20330415
Harrison17879309
Rankin13594278
Jackson13429246
Madison10088217
Lee9970174
Jones8370163
Forrest7670152
Lauderdale7188241
Lowndes6387146
Lamar622486
Lafayette6184118
Washington5332133
Bolivar4801132
Oktibbeha462198
Panola4582106
Pearl River4506146
Marshall4435103
Warren4386121
Pontotoc420172
Monroe4107133
Union410076
Neshoba4030176
Lincoln3962110
Hancock378486
Leflore3493125
Sunflower335990
Tate333384
Pike3316105
Scott315773
Alcorn312768
Yazoo311469
Itawamba299777
Copiah296865
Coahoma295179
Simpson294988
Tippah288168
Prentiss279760
Adams278782
Marion269080
Leake267473
Wayne262641
Grenada261386
Covington258281
George247848
Newton246261
Winston227081
Tishomingo226667
Jasper221048
Attala214273
Chickasaw207757
Holmes188873
Clay185254
Stone182433
Tallahatchie178541
Clarke177980
Calhoun170532
Yalobusha164238
Smith162334
Walthall133945
Greene130533
Lawrence128524
Montgomery126742
Noxubee126734
Perry126338
Amite123042
Carroll121828
Webster114532
Jefferson Davis107033
Tunica105226
Claiborne102430
Benton99525
Humphreys96533
Kemper95728
Franklin83623
Quitman80716
Choctaw76318
Wilkinson67230
Jefferson65528
Sharkey50217
Issaquena1686
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Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 531404

Reported Deaths: 10985
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson765501522
Mobile41036805
Madison34789503
Tuscaloosa25788453
Montgomery24340589
Shelby23449249
Baldwin21154308
Lee15882171
Calhoun14511314
Morgan14306279
Etowah13843353
Marshall12232223
Houston10570281
Elmore10068205
Limestone9974151
Cullman9676194
St. Clair9661243
Lauderdale9427241
DeKalb8831186
Talladega8227176
Walker7241277
Autauga6926108
Jackson6814112
Blount6678137
Colbert6306134
Coffee5519119
Dale4838111
Russell441538
Chilton4296112
Franklin426082
Covington4129118
Tallapoosa4023152
Escambia393677
Chambers3573123
Dallas3551152
Clarke351161
Marion3122101
Pike310977
Lawrence300398
Winston274473
Bibb260964
Geneva250477
Marengo249564
Pickens234461
Barbour231057
Hale223077
Butler216069
Fayette212562
Henry188844
Cherokee185245
Randolph180542
Monroe177540
Washington167339
Macon159650
Clay156756
Crenshaw152557
Cleburne148941
Lamar142535
Lowndes138853
Wilcox127130
Bullock122841
Conecuh110529
Perry107726
Coosa107628
Sumter104732
Greene92534
Choctaw60724
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