STREAMING NOW: Watch Now

Obama, Snoop Dogg and Stevie Wonder are among those paying tribute to Nipsey Hussle

Article Image

A funeral procession will follow Nipsey Hussle's public memorial at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Posted: Apr 11, 2019 5:00 PM
Updated: Apr 11, 2019 5:00 PM

During Nipsey's Hussle's Los Angeles funeral service Thursday, Snoop Dogg remembered the first time Nipsey "pushed up on me with a tape," trying to get the world-famous Long Beach rapper to listen to his music.

Nipsey told him, "Just give it a listen," which struck Snoop as odd. Most rappers trying to catch Snoop's ear talk about making money, but Nipsey didn't want a handout. He was ready to earn everything he got, Snoop said.

Nipsey was more a movement than a musician

Snoop didn't listen to Nipsey's tape that first time, but the second time he got one of Nip's CDs, he used it to roll a blunt in the back of a car. He put in the CD, he said, and his first impression was, "Damn, cuz hard."

Snoop said the two shared a kinship. They repped Los Angeles. They're both tall, lanky, wear braids and claim their street gang affiliation, but what Snoop said he will remember most is Nipsey's "kind spirit" and how he served as a "peace advocate," making music with rival gang members and showing love to everyone no matter the colors they flew.

"This man got a letter from Barack Obama, man," Snoop said before turning to the sprawling wall of flowers forming the backdrop to Nipsey's coffin and saluting.

Karen Civil, Nipsey's longtime friend and marketing strategist, read the letter from Obama, whose daughters introduced him to Nipsey's music. The president thanked the rapper -- who was slain last month -- for lifting up his South Central Los Angeles community.

"He set an example for young people to follow and is a legacy worthy to follow," Civil said, reading Obama's words.

The stars align for Nipsey

Calling Nipsey a "prophetic soul," Nation of Islam Minister Farrakhan said the artist, born Ermias Asghedom, meant to hip-hop what Bob Marley meant to reggae. Farrakhan applauded him for his efforts to forge ties between the Crips street gang, to which Nipsey belonged, and the rival Bloods.

"He lived the gang life, but he didn't stay there," Farrakhan said. "Sometimes when you can fly above the circumstances of your life, it produce envy and enmity and jealousy among those who have not learned how to fly, but Ermias was more than a hip-hop artist. He was a voice and brilliant mind, and the spirit of God was in his life."

Tickets for Thursday's "Celebration of Life" were made available free of charge to California residents earlier this week. They were gone in 30 minutes. The Staples Center, home to the Los Angeles Lakers and Clippers, accommodates about 21,000 people.

The funeral was packed with musical performances, beginning with Los Angeles' DJ Battlecat spinning tracks from Nipsey's latest album "Victory Lap," with a live band performing backup, before Frank Sinatra's "My Way" played over the speakers. Fans chanted the rapper's name, held aloft their cell phones like lighters and waved Eritrean flags, honoring his ancestry.

Stevie Wonder also took the stage. He recalled meeting the rapper and said he hopes his death spurs the nation to take gun violence more seriously.

"I'm very happy that in his short life he was able to motivate people, and I hope that it motivates you to say, 'Enough of people being killed by guns and violence,'" he said.

The multiplatinum R&B singer and pianist then played "Rocket Love," one of Nipsey's favorite Stevie Wonder songs, and Eric Clapton's "Tears in Heaven."

The beauty of Stevie Wonder's performance

The performance was something Nipsey wished for on his 2016 track, "Ocean Views," on which he rapped, "Hundred-thousand in my coffin, that's just light dough / Play a Stevie Wonder song, smoke some flight, bro."

Singers Anthony Hamilton, Marsha Ambrosius and Jhene Aiko, who delayed the release of new music this month to reflect on Nipsey's death, also performed.

Aiko performed "Eternal Sunshine," whose lyrics begin, "Is is strange for me to say that / If I were to die today / There's not a thing I would change / I've lived well / Maybe I have made mistakes and been through my fair share of pain / But all in all, it's been OK, I've lived well."

Organizers have announced a procession following the service that will run 20 to 25 miles through the streets of Los Angeles and encompass places that were important to the rapper.

Moving words from Nipsey's family

His mother, Angelique Smith, shared anecdotes about her precocious yet stoic boy who loved amusement park rides and, as an adult, embraced a child-like joy while riding his all-terrain vehicle up and down Fifth Avenue near the Hyde Park neighborhood where he was slain.

Video showed Nipsey playing as a kid, traveling to Africa on an airplane, practicing the Tigrigna language and telling his father, "I love you, daddy."

His brother, Samuel Asghedom, recalled Nipsey's intelligence, how at a young age he built a computer from spare parts and later taught himself to make music on it.

He paraphrased a lyric from Nip's song, "I Don't Stress" -- "I could die today, I've made the set proud" -- and, pointing to the crowd, said, "You made the world proud. Look at this s**t, bro." The capacity crowd roared.

"Everything he said in the music is who he was," Asghedom said. "You stand up for what you believe in. You put your money where your mouth is. You never fold. ... I hope everybody knows that's what bro did. Bro stayed and he died on Crenshaw and Slauson."

Longtime girlfriend Lauren London praised the love of her life as an amazing father and said, "I am honored and blessed that I got to experience such a man." Nipsey always said: They can't take away what's inside someone, she recalled. Now, she said, Nipsey resides in all who loved him.

"My heart hears you. I feel you everywhere. I'm so grateful I had you, and until we meet again, the marathon continues," she said referencing her boyfriend's 2011 mixtape.

Nipsey had a son, Kross, 2, with London, as well as a daughter, Emani, from a previous relationship.

Some fans journeyed a long way to pay respects

Mourners from as far away as Maryland and Minnesota traveled to Los Angeles to honor Nipsey, who they say was a major influence in their lives.

Eritrea-born restaurant owner and activist Wintana Nelekin traveled from Minnesota to honor Nipsey, whom she met once after organizing a speech for young people in Minneapolis. She said he taught her that her opportunities were layered and boundless.

"He showed me a vision of how to be a community organizer, how to be an entrepreneur, how to be a community leader, and you don't get a lot of that today," she said. "Nipsey meant the world to me. I don't even know how to describe this loss. ... Nipsey really showed me that I could be anything I wanted to be."

Latrell Parker, a barber and photographer from Fredericksburg, Virginia, also traveled across the country to honor the rapper. Wearing a shirt bearing the musician's image with the caption "The Marathon Continues," he told CNN that as an entrepreneur himself, he always admired how Nipsey taught others to pursue their goals.

"Take it as big as you want to make it, as far as you want to go. That's what Nipsey said," Parker told CNN. "I'm all for getting out there creating your own opportunities, creating opportunities for your people. That's what Nipsey was about. It's just beautiful."

Added Breanna Henderson, who was attending the vigil with friends: "We're sad to see him go, but we're happy that he left a legacy for us to continue."

The rapper's reach was bigger than music

The Eritrean-American rhymesmith was beloved not only for his Grammy-nominated music -- he dropped a dozen or more mixtapes before releasing his studio debut, "Victory Lap," to acclaim last year -- but also for his activism and entrepreneurship dedicated to uplifting his community.

Those who knew him say he cherished the Crenshaw District where he grew up. The 33-year-old owned businesses there, invested in the community, paid for funerals and kids' shoes and counted several Los Angeles rappers among his influences and collaborators.

Steph Curry: Nipsey 'was just getting started'

Though he was a member of the Rollin 60s Neighborhood Crips, he reached out to police leaders before he died to discuss ways to curb gang violence and help youngsters. He also made music with Bloods-affiliated rappers such as The Game and YG, who counted him as a friend.

YG was an honorary pallbearer Thursday. Appearing alongside DJ Mustard, the Compton rapper told the crowd that Nipsey was his "brother from another color" and said that when they were together they never spoke about meaningless things. They discussed goals, family, homies and raising daughters, he said.

"Our brother never left the 'hood," Farrahan said during Thursday's service before referencing the rival gangs' colors. "As he loved the red, he loved the blue. ... He walked among the blue with a heart for the red and all the colors in between because his life was for the unity of the red and the blue, the unity of the 'hood. So when we celebrate Nipsey, we must celebrate unity."

Nipsey was gunned down March 31 in Los Angeles near the clothing store he owned at Slauson Avenue and Crenshaw Boulevard. Eric Holder, a man Nipsey knew, repeatedly approached the rapper that Sunday afternoon before returning with a handgun that he "purposely and repeatedly fired" at the rapper, killing him and injuring two others, Los Angeles police Chief Michel Moore said.

Holder has pleaded not guilty to one charge of murder and two counts of attempted murder. The 29-year-old was also charged at his arraignment with possession of a firearm by a felon.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 15752

Reported Deaths: 739
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Hinds100625
Lauderdale73862
Madison72423
Scott65012
Neshoba64639
Jones62928
Forrest56438
DeSoto5427
Rankin4398
Holmes42928
Leake42712
Copiah3124
Jackson30813
Attala29817
Yazoo2814
Newton2714
Leflore26431
Lincoln26329
Harrison2587
Monroe25725
Oktibbeha23912
Lamar2385
Lowndes2119
Pearl River20931
Wayne2041
Pike20311
Adams19915
Noxubee1866
Washington1787
Warren17310
Covington1652
Jasper1634
Bolivar16211
Lee1536
Smith15211
Kemper14411
Clarke14418
Lafayette1364
Chickasaw13512
Coahoma1254
Carroll11711
Winston1171
Marion1159
Clay1124
Claiborne1112
Lawrence1021
Simpson1010
Tate941
Grenada943
Yalobusha935
Hancock9111
Wilkinson889
Itawamba877
Montgomery851
Sunflower843
Union835
Marshall833
Jefferson Davis773
Tippah7311
Panola713
Webster692
Calhoun654
Amite641
Humphreys607
Walthall560
Tunica553
Prentiss533
Perry503
Choctaw432
Jefferson421
Pontotoc353
Quitman330
Tishomingo320
Stone300
Franklin292
Tallahatchie271
George251
Alcorn171
Benton150
Greene131
Sharkey70
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Confirmed Cases: 18150

Reported Deaths: 644
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Mobile2239116
Jefferson1837102
Montgomery171040
Tuscaloosa78315
Marshall6939
Franklin5567
Lee54833
Shelby51720
Tallapoosa42765
Butler41118
Chambers35525
Walker3542
Elmore3548
Madison3394
Baldwin2909
Morgan2801
Dallas2723
Etowah25711
DeKalb2483
Lowndes24612
Coffee2361
Sumter2247
Autauga2214
Houston2204
Bullock2095
Pike2030
Colbert1842
Hale1739
Russell1710
Marengo1706
Barbour1671
Lauderdale1642
Calhoun1603
Choctaw1538
Wilcox1487
Clarke1442
Cullman1430
Randolph1277
St. Clair1231
Marion12211
Pickens1164
Dale1150
Talladega1135
Limestone1060
Chilton1011
Greene944
Winston900
Macon824
Henry802
Covington801
Jackson782
Crenshaw753
Bibb751
Washington706
Escambia633
Blount621
Lawrence500
Geneva430
Conecuh411
Coosa401
Monroe402
Perry390
Cherokee373
Clay272
Lamar260
Fayette160
Cleburne151
Unassigned00
Tupelo
Clear
84° wxIcon
Hi: 85° Lo: 64°
Feels Like: 84°
Columbus
Clear
82° wxIcon
Hi: 88° Lo: 68°
Feels Like: 82°
Oxford
Clear
79° wxIcon
Hi: 83° Lo: 61°
Feels Like: 79°
Starkville
Clear
77° wxIcon
Hi: 86° Lo: 62°
Feels Like: 79°
WTVA Radar
WTVA Temperatures
WTVA Severe Weather