BREAKING NEWS Finally Feeling Like Fall Full Story

Drone footage shows wildfire devastation

CNN captured this drone footage that shows the devastation in Paradise, California after the deadly wildfire, Camp Fire, that is still burning north of the state's capital.

Posted: Nov 23, 2018 7:33 AM
Updated: Nov 23, 2018 7:44 AM

The deadliest blaze in California history is nearly contained after firefighters got a little help from the rain. While more rain Friday could mean an end to the two-week fire, it also brings the risks of flooding and mudslides.

The Camp Fire in Northern California, which has killed 84 people, is now 95% contained, according to Cal Fire.

An-inch-and-a-half of rain Wednesday all but extinguished the blaze, National Weather Service meteorologist Bill Rasch said.

Just that inch and a half of precipitation hit the "sweet spot," Rasch said. "We needed it to come in and rain, and rain not too heavy."

Water is the solution for the scorched region, extinguishing the flames and clearing the smoke from the air. But it also brings more problems: flooding, mudslides and the flow of debris.

"Rainfall that would normally be absorbed will run off extremely quickly after a wildfire, as burned soil can be as water-repellent as pavement," the National Weather Service said.

The National Weather Service has two meteorologists onsite monitoring conditions at the Camp Fire. Rasch said they are paying close attention to the rate of rainfall, as two to four inches were forecast to hit the upper end of the Campfire by Friday morning.

New obstacles to recovery

Floods, mudslides, and debris flow is an especially dangerous cocktail following the devastation of a wildfire.

"It makes the ground really unstable for firefighters, Sacramento Fire Capt. Dave Lauchner told CNN affiliate KTXL on Thursday.

"But we just keep our eyes open, make sure we're in safe areas and watch out for each other."

Butte County Sheriff and Coroner Kory Honea told the affiliate that his department would continue searching for the missing as long as conditions were not too dangerous.

But floods and mudslides may bring danger right to victims' backyards.

Almost 1 million people in Northern California are under a flash flood watch that remains in effect through Friday morning, CNN meteorologist Haley Brink said.

"If you can look uphill from where you are and see a burnt-out area, you are at risk," the National Weather Service said.

And the risk of damage is both great and far-reaching. The running debris and flood water can be powerful enough to destroy culverts, roadways and buildings, the National Weather Service said, even reaching miles away from the affected areas.

They fled the fire, now they are fleeing the water

About 10 minutes from Paradise, a town devastated by the Camp Fire, evacuees with nowhere else to go have set up a temporary encampment in a Walmart parking lot in Chico.

The camp became a community where volunteers distributed essential supplies.

"Walmart was one of the generous community partners that offered a site for respite and relief. Courageous and compassionate community volunteers came together and built an immediate safe place for many evacuees," the city of Chico said in a statement.

But as the weather turns, Walmart is encouraging the evacuees to find safer shelter.

"The weather forecast from the National Weather Service showing steady rain continuing through Friday has heightened our existing concerns and increased the urgency to find a more sustainable solution," company spokeswoman Delia Garcia said.

The company and the city offered free bus rides to the steadily more available shelters, as well as gas gift cards, money and food.

Woolsey Fire

The Woolsey Fire in Southern California, where rain is also expected, reached 100% containment Wednesday.

The fire has killed three people and burned nearly 100,000 acres—big enough for the scar to be seen from space via NASA's Terra satellite.

Three residents of Ventura and Los Angeles counties have filed a complaint against Southern California Edison Company, a supplier of electricity.

"Had Southern California Edison Company followed the standard of care in inspecting, maintaining and repairing its overhead lines, properly maintaining its electrical equipment, and trimming away vegetation from its wires as is required by law and industry standards, the catastrophic Woolsey Fire could have been avoided," said Patrick McNicholas, an attorney representing the plaintiffs.

Southern California Edison declined to comment on the lawsuit, saying Cal Fire and the Ventura County Fire Department are investigating the cause of the fire.

A similar lawsuit on behalf of 22 victims of the Camp Fire was filed last week, claiming the electric company PG&E was responsible for the fires. The company reported an outage on the day the fire began.

In response, PG&E said that the exact cause of the fire has not been determined.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 497790

Reported Deaths: 9917
CountyCasesDeaths
Harrison34102530
DeSoto31839398
Hinds31837622
Jackson24314377
Rankin21881388
Lee15427234
Madison14525279
Jones13772241
Forrest13412250
Lauderdale11937314
Lowndes10934185
Lamar10470135
Pearl River9431237
Lafayette8454138
Hancock7697126
Washington7365156
Oktibbeha7111129
Monroe6727174
Warren6642176
Pontotoc6609101
Neshoba6606205
Panola6460131
Marshall6386132
Bolivar6266145
Union596094
Pike5784152
Alcorn5633101
Lincoln5417134
George491879
Scott470998
Tippah465381
Prentiss464181
Leflore4627143
Itawamba4596104
Adams4570119
Tate4546109
Copiah445191
Simpson4421116
Wayne438572
Yazoo438586
Covington427394
Marion4216107
Sunflower4215104
Coahoma4115104
Leake407787
Newton380879
Grenada3692108
Stone358464
Tishomingo356391
Attala330289
Jasper328265
Winston313191
Clay306375
Chickasaw296767
Clarke290694
Calhoun277945
Holmes266987
Smith262550
Yalobusha232647
Tallahatchie225251
Walthall217763
Greene215548
Lawrence211140
Perry204755
Amite203954
Webster201645
Noxubee185340
Montgomery179056
Jefferson Davis170642
Carroll167438
Tunica158639
Benton147438
Kemper141241
Choctaw133026
Claiborne131237
Humphreys129038
Franklin119128
Quitman106227
Wilkinson104539
Jefferson94234
Sharkey64020
Issaquena1937
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 813481

Reported Deaths: 15179
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson1139971910
Mobile722271323
Madison51970686
Shelby37279341
Baldwin37069540
Tuscaloosa34934599
Montgomery33953725
Lee23142240
Calhoun22142470
Morgan20639372
Etowah19758496
Marshall18245300
Houston17302405
St. Clair15912337
Cullman15306290
Limestone15202198
Elmore15075284
Lauderdale14143294
Talladega13715272
DeKalb12569259
Walker11085366
Blount10094174
Autauga9893146
Jackson9789180
Coffee9182189
Dale8859181
Colbert8789200
Tallapoosa7044195
Escambia6732127
Covington6682179
Chilton6587160
Russell625958
Franklin5930105
Chambers5559142
Marion4955126
Dallas4882199
Clarke472782
Pike4719105
Geneva4564126
Winston4473101
Lawrence4264117
Bibb421686
Barbour355475
Marengo334089
Monroe330262
Randolph327063
Butler324794
Pickens313882
Henry310965
Hale309187
Cherokee299957
Fayette290679
Washington250951
Cleburne246958
Crenshaw243575
Clay240367
Macon230562
Lamar215846
Conecuh185652
Coosa178538
Lowndes173761
Wilcox167438
Bullock151744
Perry138040
Sumter131038
Greene125544
Choctaw86927
Out of AL00
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Tupelo
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Hi: 71° Lo: 44°
Feels Like: 70°
Columbus
Clear
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Hi: 70° Lo: 46°
Feels Like: 71°
Oxford
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68° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 41°
Feels Like: 68°
Starkville
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Hi: 70° Lo: 45°
Feels Like: 68°
A cold front passing through our area overnight will bring into our area some of the coolest temperatures of the season so far. We will see most of the highs this weekend only in the upper 60s to lower 70s. While overnight lows will drop off down into the 40s Saturday night.
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