White House rebuffs idea Trump was mocking Ford

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders says President Donald Trump was not mocking Christine Blasey Ford at his rally in Mississippi.

Posted: Oct 4, 2018 10:12 AM
Updated: Oct 4, 2018 10:32 AM

It's judgment day for Brett Kavanaugh and the three crucial Republicans who could send him to the Supreme Court or doom his hopes of being the swing vote who could change America.

Kavanaugh's fate will be on the line for the second straight Thursday, as senators begin reading the results of the supplemental background check compiled by the FBI a week after Christine Blasey Ford accused the nominee of sexual assault in the most politically charged hearing in decades.

Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell meanwhile set in motion a process designed to lead to a procedural vote on Kavanaugh's nomination on Friday, that would possibly lead to a final vote as early as the following day.

The six days that have elapsed since the hearing have only made the confirmation showdown for President Donald Trump's pick more divisive and deepened the cavern of mistrust between Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill, just five weeks before midterm elections.

Confirming Kavanaugh under such circumstances could stoke GOP turnout in the elections and reconcile the decades-long goal of a conservative majority on the Supreme Court. But it also seems certain to further alienate women voters in the #MeToo era in a way that could have huge implications in November and in Trump's re-election race.

While Kavanaugh has the most to lose, and Ford is waiting to see whether her decision to shatter her own privacy in a hearing watched around the world will have any effect, the next few days promise to be agonizing for three Republicans senators who control the judge's fate.

Fierce pressure is building on Arizona's Jeff Flake, Maine's Susan Collins and Alaska's Lisa Murkowski, who have all expressed reservations about Kavanaugh, and face a choice with stark implications for their political careers and legacies.

"Everyone has asked 'what's it going to say? How am I going to react?' I have no idea, in truth and fairness. I have no idea, so I'm going" wait," Murkowski told reporters on Wednesday.

The decision for Collins and Flake may have been further complicated Wednesday night when Kavanaugh's former Yale roommate, James Roche, alleged on CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360" that Kavanaugh lied about the extent of his drinking during last week's wrenching hearing. Both senators have drawn a red line on their votes on Kavanaugh, saying they will not vote to confirm him if they believe he lied under oath.

"We were in a room together -- our beds were 10 feet apart for a couple of months," Roche told Cooper. "And what struck me and made me more interested in speaking out about it is not only did I know that he wasn't telling, you know, the truth, I knew that he knew that he wasn't telling the truth."

Sources told CNN that senators will be allowed to start reading the FBI investigation summaries on Kavanaugh Thursday morning.

The probe was re-opened last week after Flake, concerned that the bitter imbroglio of Kavanaugh's confirmation process was tearing America apart, made his vote conditional on further investigations of Ford's allegations, dating from the 1980s when she and Kavanaugh were high schoolers.

Trump, hoping to soon celebrate a second confirmed pick to the Supreme Court that would deliver a consequential legacy, quickly took to Twitter to create momentum behind Kavanaugh.

"Wow, such enthusiasm and energy for Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Look at the Energy, look at the Polls. Something very big is happening. He is a fine man and great intellect. The country is with him all the way!" Trump wrote.

Crucial questions

When senators get their first look at the FBI summaries, it will be a critical moment for Kavanaugh.

It is likely to quickly become clear whether they give the three Republicans political cover to vote for, or against Kavanaugh and whether Democrats consider the FBI's efforts, under the direction of committee Republicans and the White House to be a genuine investigation.

The findings could shed light on the credibility of Ford's accusations, the sustainability of Kavanaugh's denial and wider questions about the judge's character that have exploded into the debate over his prospects since his volatile performance during last Thursday's hearing.

The report could also shed some light on Kavanaugh's candor and truthfulness, which have also emerged as a potential challenge to his nomination.

The extent of the Kavanaugh's drinking and partying in the 1980s does not directly touch on whether he is qualified to sit on the Supreme Court decades later after a distinguished career as a jurist.

But if information emerges to contradict his assertions that he never blacked out while drinking it could cast doubt on his denials that he did not assault Ford at a house party in the 1980 since she testified he was heavily drunk at the time.

Kavanaugh could also face questions if there are suggestions in the summaries that he did not tell the truth under oath about his past, since he is auditioning for a job on the highest court in the land that relies on the idea that its members are themselves beyond legal reproach.

Among those interviewed by the FBI was Mark Judge, a friend of Kavanaugh's who Ford said was in the room at the time of the alleged assault. Ford's attorneys said in a statement late Wednesday night the FBI had not contacted Ford for an interview, leaving them "profoundly disappointed that after the tremendous sacrifice she made in coming forward, those directing the FBI investigation were not interested in seeking the truth."

It would take something substantial to change in the perception of Kavanaugh's past and character to change the fervent desire of most of the Senate GOP to get him confirmed quickly.

Political polarization deepens

The three key Republican senators all criticized the President on Wednesday after he went on the attack against Ford at a campaign rally.

In a rare appearance in the White House briefing room, spokeswoman Sarah Sanders denied Trump mocked Ford and instead unleashed a barrage against Democrats she said had made the judge and his accuser "victims" of a politicized effort to kill the nomination.

Her anger appeared to reflect real frustration in the White House that the week of limbo since last week's hearing has unfolded as a prolonged examination of Kavanaugh's behavior and past, but has not been accompanied by similar scrutiny of Ford's accusations.

"Every single word that Judge Kavanaugh has said has been looked at, examined, picked apart by most of you in this room. But no one is looking at whether or not the accusations made are corroborated, whether or not there's evidence to support them," Sanders said.

'We will not be intimidated'

McConnell warned that the decisions made by senators would not be influenced by protesters invading their offices on Capitol Hill or confronting them in airports or at home.

Still, Kavanaugh's fate is not entirely in McConnell's hands. Should all the Democrats stick together, he can only afford to lose one Republican senator and still confirm Trump's pick.

That means decision time is now at hand for Collins, Flake and Murkowski.

Collins has been under relentless pressure from liberal groups in Maine to oppose Kavanaugh. But she needs to retain good ties with fellow Republicans to preserve her image as a pragmatist and moderating force in the party.

Trump's attack on Ford put her in an even more difficult position -- one reason why she called the President's approach "just plain wrong."

Like Collins, Murkowski has a political profile that is often independent from the wider GOP, especially after winning a write-in election eight years ago against a Tea Party opponent, meaning that her vote is difficult to predict. She also has a reputation as a senator who prioritizes women's issues and draws supports from some Democrats in her elections.

Flake has been an outspoken critic of Trump. But he has often fallen back into line with party leaders in the end. But he is also retiring after the next election, so may feel more free to take a swipe at one of the President's legacy priorities.

Democratic leaders cannot also feel completely confident that their caucus will stick together.

West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, seeking re-election in a state overwhelmingly won by Trump in 2016, described the President's comments' on Ford as "wrong."

But he said he remains "completely undecided" as he awaits the FBI report.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 497790

Reported Deaths: 9917
CountyCasesDeaths
Harrison34102530
DeSoto31839398
Hinds31837622
Jackson24314377
Rankin21881388
Lee15427234
Madison14525279
Jones13772241
Forrest13412250
Lauderdale11937314
Lowndes10934185
Lamar10470135
Pearl River9431237
Lafayette8454138
Hancock7697126
Washington7365156
Oktibbeha7111129
Monroe6727174
Warren6642176
Pontotoc6609101
Neshoba6606205
Panola6460131
Marshall6386132
Bolivar6266145
Union596094
Pike5784152
Alcorn5633101
Lincoln5417134
George491879
Scott470998
Tippah465381
Prentiss464181
Leflore4627143
Itawamba4596104
Adams4570119
Tate4546109
Copiah445191
Simpson4421116
Wayne438572
Yazoo438586
Covington427394
Marion4216107
Sunflower4215104
Coahoma4115104
Leake407787
Newton380879
Grenada3692108
Stone358464
Tishomingo356391
Attala330289
Jasper328265
Winston313191
Clay306375
Chickasaw296767
Clarke290694
Calhoun277945
Holmes266987
Smith262550
Yalobusha232647
Tallahatchie225251
Walthall217763
Greene215548
Lawrence211140
Perry204755
Amite203954
Webster201645
Noxubee185340
Montgomery179056
Jefferson Davis170642
Carroll167438
Tunica158639
Benton147438
Kemper141241
Choctaw133026
Claiborne131237
Humphreys129038
Franklin119128
Quitman106227
Wilkinson104539
Jefferson94234
Sharkey64020
Issaquena1937
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 814025

Reported Deaths: 15179
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson1140561910
Mobile722691323
Madison52017686
Shelby37304341
Baldwin37087540
Tuscaloosa34966599
Montgomery33971725
Lee23149240
Calhoun22159470
Morgan20659372
Etowah19764496
Marshall18254300
Houston17310405
St. Clair15921337
Cullman15325290
Limestone15222198
Elmore15086284
Lauderdale14157294
Talladega13723272
DeKalb12574259
Walker11089366
Blount10102174
Autauga9901146
Jackson9793180
Coffee9182189
Dale8864181
Colbert8791200
Tallapoosa7044195
Escambia6743127
Covington6685179
Chilton6592160
Russell626158
Franklin5935105
Chambers5560142
Marion4958126
Dallas4889199
Clarke473482
Pike4720105
Geneva4564126
Winston4476101
Lawrence4266117
Bibb421786
Barbour355675
Marengo334089
Monroe330462
Randolph327663
Butler324894
Pickens313982
Henry311265
Hale309487
Cherokee300057
Fayette290979
Washington251151
Cleburne247058
Crenshaw243775
Clay240767
Macon230762
Lamar217846
Conecuh185652
Coosa178838
Lowndes174161
Wilcox167738
Bullock151744
Perry138040
Sumter131138
Greene125844
Choctaw87027
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