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Watergate Fast Facts

Here's a look at Watergate, the 1970s political scandal that led to the resignation of ...

Posted: Jun 2, 2018 11:17 AM
Updated: Jun 2, 2018 11:17 AM

Here's a look at Watergate, the 1970s political scandal that led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon.

Timeline:
June 17, 1972 - Five men are arrested after breaking into Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington, DC. White House press secretary Ron Ziegler describes the incident as a "third-rate burglary."

October 10, 1972 - The Washington Post publishes a story by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, stating that the FBI believes aides to President Nixon are responsible for the Watergate break in.

November 7, 1972 - President Richard Nixon is elected to a second term in office, defeating Democratic candidate George McGovern.

January 30, 1973 - Former FBI agent G. Gordon Liddy and former CIA employee James McCord, security director of the Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP), are found guilty of conspiracy, burglary and bugging DNC headquarters. E. Howard Hunt, a former CIA operative, and four others involved ended their trials by pleading guilty.

April 30, 1973 - Four of Nixon's top officials resign as the Watergate scandal grows: John Dean, White House counsel; H. R. Haldeman, chief of staff; John D. Ehrlichman, assistant for domestic affairs; and Attorney General Richard Kleindienst.

May 17, 1973 - The Senate Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities opens hearings into the Watergate incident, chaired by Senator Sam Ervin (D, NC). The hearings are nationally televised.

May 19, 1973 - Archibald Cox is appointed special prosecutor in the Watergate investigation.

June 25-29, 1973 - Dean testifies before the Senate Select Committee about the White House, and Nixon's, involvement in the Watergate break-in and cover-up.

July 16, 1973 - During the Watergate hearings, former aide Alexander Butterfield reveals that Nixon has been secretly recording all of his White House conversations since 1971.

July 23, 1973 - In a letter to Ervin, Nixon explains his reason for not turning over the presidential tapes as "the special nature of tape recordings of private conversations is such that these principles (of executive privilege) apply with even greater force to tapes of private presidential conversations than to presidential papers."

July 26, 1973 - Nixon responds to two subpoenas issued by the Ervin committee, by saying he will not comply with requests for copies of White House recordings. He also refuses a similar request from special prosecutor Cox.

August 29, 1973 - Federal Judge John Sirica orders Nixon to turn over the tapes to him to be privately examined. Nixon does not comply and appeals all subpoenas and orders with regards to surrendering the tapes.

October 19, 1973 - The appeal is denied and the president is ordered to turn over the tapes to Cox. Nixon offers to give a summary of the White House conversations personally edited by him and verified by Senator John Stennis (D, MS) instead. The summary offer is rejected and Cox is ordered to drop the case. Cox refuses.

October 20, 1973 - In what becomes known as the "Saturday Night Massacre," President Nixon orders the firing of Cox as special prosecutor. Rather than comply, Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus resign. Cox is eventually fired by Solicitor General Robert Bork.

November 1, 1973 - Leon Jaworski is named the special prosecutor.

November 21, 1973 - The White House reveals that one of the subpoenaed recordings, dated June 20, 1972, has an 18-minute gap. Nixon's secretary, Rose Mary Woods, says she is responsible for accidentally erasing the tape.

April 30, 1974 - The White House releases edited transcripts, more than 1,200 pages, of the presidential tapes.

July 24, 1974 - The Supreme Court unanimously rules that Nixon must immediately turn over the original recordings of more than 64 conversations to special prosecutor Jaworski.

July 27, 1974 - The House Judiciary Committee approves three articles of impeachment against Nixon. The recommendation is then sent to the full House of Representatives for a vote.

July 31, 1974 - The remaining tapes, having been turned over to Jaworski, reveal a conversation from June 23, 1972, that proves the president's knowledge of the cover-up from the beginning.

August 8, 1974 - Nixon addresses the nation on TV: "I have never been a quitter. To leave office before my term is completed is abhorrent to every instinct in my body. But as president, I must put the interest of America first. America needs a full-time president and a full-time Congress, particularly at this time with problems we face at home and abroad. To continue to fight through the months ahead for my personal vindication would almost totally absorb the time and attention of both the president and the Congress in a period when our entire focus should be on the great issues of peace abroad and prosperity without inflation at home. Therefore, I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow."

August 9, 1974 - Nixon signs a letter of resignation and Vice President Gerald Ford becomes president.

September 8, 1974 - Ford pardons Nixon.

January 1, 1975 - Former Attorney General John Mitchell, former aide Ehrlichmann and former Chief of Staff Haldeman are found guilty of obstruction of justice.

1977 - In a series of interviews with David Frost, Nixon defends his actions during the Watergate investigation, "I'm saying when the president does it, that means it's not illegal."

April 22, 1994 - Nixon dies at the age of 81.

May 31, 2005 - The Washington Post confirms that former FBI agent Mark Felt was "Deep Throat," the informant who provided reporters Woodward and Bernstein with insider information during the Watergate scandal.

July 29, 2014 - For the 40th anniversary of Nixon's resignation, historians Douglas Brinkley and Luke Nichter publish "The Nixon Tapes: 1971-1972," transcriptions from a selection of Nixon's White House audio recordings.

Major Players:

The Watergate break-in:

Bernard Baker - One of the Watergate burglars. Pleaded guilty to wiretapping and theft and served 14 months in prison.

Virgilio R. Gonzalez - One of the Watergate burglars. Pleaded guilty to wiretapping and theft and served 16 months.

E. Howard Hunt - Former CIA agent, counsel to CREEP, and organizer of the Watergate break-in. Pleaded guilty to burglary, conspiracy and wiretapping and served 33 months.

G. Gordon Liddy - Former FBI agent and organizer of the Watergate break-in. Convicted of burglary, conspiracy and wiretapping and served 4.5 years.

Eugenio Martinez - One of the Watergate burglars. Pleaded guilty to conspiracy, burglary and wiretapping and served 15 months. He was later pardoned by President Ronald Reagan.

James McCord - Former CIA agent, Security Director for CREEP and one of the Watergate burglars. Convicted of burglary, conspiracy and wiretapping and served two months.

Frank Sturgis - One of the Watergate burglars. Pleaded guilty to burglary and wiretapping and served 16 months.

Committee to Re-Elect the President:

Jeb Magruder - Deputy director of CREEP. Pleaded guilty to conspiracy to obstruct justice and served seven months.

John Mitchell - Former Attorney General, Director of CREEP. Convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury and served 19 months.

The investigation:

Howard Baker - (R, TN) Vice Chairman of the Senate Watergate Committee.

Carl Bernstein - Washington Post investigative reporter.

Archibald Cox - Watergate Special Prosecutor.

Sam Ervin - (D, NC) Chairman of the Senate Watergate Committee.

"Deep Throat" - W. Mark Felt, former FBI official.

Leon Jaworski - Watergate Special Prosecutor.

John J. Sirica - Chief judge of the US District Court for the District of Columbia.

Bob Woodward - Washington Post investigative reporter.

White House:

Charles Colson - Special Counsel to the President. Pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice and served seven months.

John Dean - Chief White Counsel. Pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice and served four months.

John Ehrlichman - Assistant to the President. Convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury and served 18 months.

H.R. Haldeman - Nixon Chief of Staff. Convicted of conspiracy and obstruction of justice and served 18 months.

Richard Nixon - 37th President of the United States, pardoned.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Confirmed Cases: 94573

Reported Deaths: 2870
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Hinds7032159
DeSoto547759
Harrison380573
Jackson343069
Madison323386
Rankin322577
Lee265468
Jones245279
Forrest242571
Washington219772
Lafayette213739
Lauderdale2038125
Bolivar181366
Oktibbeha176350
Lamar165534
Neshoba1556104
Panola145527
Lowndes144958
Sunflower143946
Warren138450
Leflore138381
Pontotoc124916
Pike122450
Monroe120768
Scott117126
Copiah116633
Coahoma114428
Holmes109558
Marshall108516
Lincoln107553
Grenada107236
Yazoo104630
Simpson101844
Union98824
Tate96237
Leake94638
Adams92637
Wayne88821
Pearl River87053
Marion84535
Prentiss83417
Covington81322
Itawamba78721
Alcorn78611
Newton76723
Tallahatchie76421
George75913
Winston73519
Chickasaw66724
Tishomingo66738
Tippah65417
Attala65325
Walthall59525
Clay58518
Hancock57221
Clarke57045
Jasper56215
Noxubee54616
Smith52914
Calhoun50812
Tunica48213
Claiborne45916
Montgomery45820
Lawrence42912
Yalobusha42314
Perry41618
Humphreys37515
Quitman3735
Stone36512
Greene35917
Jefferson Davis33511
Webster33313
Amite32110
Carroll31412
Wilkinson30218
Kemper28815
Sharkey26513
Jefferson2449
Benton2232
Franklin1923
Choctaw1816
Issaquena1043
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Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Confirmed Cases: 132452

Reported Deaths: 2335
CountyConfirmedDeaths
Jefferson19306349
Mobile13233291
Montgomery8748177
Madison770978
Tuscaloosa7418116
Lee579261
Shelby578750
Baldwin514149
Marshall389244
Etowah340247
Calhoun340140
Morgan323926
Houston276423
Elmore259647
DeKalb237519
St. Clair226337
Walker225383
Talladega210628
Limestone203319
Cullman186818
Dallas175926
Franklin175229
Russell17322
Autauga171525
Lauderdale167333
Colbert162926
Blount158015
Escambia157725
Jackson154011
Chilton152431
Dale134644
Covington133427
Coffee12988
Pike11799
Chambers114442
Tallapoosa113885
Clarke107017
Marion95429
Butler91139
Barbour8517
Winston71812
Marengo70519
Lowndes65227
Pickens64514
Bibb63810
Randolph62713
Hale61928
Lawrence60522
Bullock59714
Geneva5864
Cherokee58315
Monroe5808
Clay5547
Washington55113
Perry5396
Conecuh53011
Wilcox53011
Crenshaw52732
Henry4835
Macon47920
Fayette4358
Sumter43219
Lamar3572
Choctaw34412
Cleburne3356
Greene30315
Coosa1673
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