Were slavery and liberation a choice? A conversation beyond Kanye West

The black community was up in arms over Kanye West's remarks about slavery -- for 400 years -- being a choice....

Posted: May 27, 2018 11:45 AM
Updated: May 27, 2018 11:45 AM

The black community was up in arms over Kanye West's remarks about slavery -- for 400 years -- being a choice.

Whether the artist's comments were coming from a space of enlightenment or insanity, his words "choice" and "slavery" in the same sentence were mixing like oil and water for black folk. But after we settle down, take a breath, we may ask ourselves, very gently: Did African slaves really have a choice? Or more critical as we pass through the Memorial Day holiday: Is liberation a choice?

These are two questions we two writers want to think about. But before we move along here, let us remind ourselves that American slavery or any kind of slavery for that matter, as a collective history and experience, is very difficult to think, talk and feel about. And since the whole discussion is a trigger subject, we recommend caution, reflection and an open mind.

Was slavery a choice?

David Love: Slavery was a choice that white supremacy made against black lives and freedom.

Consider the circumstances that allowed slavery to take place. African people were kidnaped at gunpoint, held in dungeons off the coast of West Africa before they were packed and stacked in floating dungeons known as slave ships. They were doomed to make the journey across the Atlantic, known as the dreaded Middle Passage, where millions died due to the horrific conditions on those ships.

Those who survived were traumatized, separated from their families and communities, their institutions, traditions and belief systems. They did not speak the language of their captors, who foisted a religion upon them -- complete with a white god -- and preached that black people were inferior and doomed to slavery in perpetuity.

Southern states enacted the "Slave Codes," to monitor and codify oppression into law, deputizing white America as prison guards of the plantations. These laws reflected white racial paranoia and fear of servile insurrection and assumed black people would break their chains if given the chance.

Offenses such as insurrection -- including publishing literature encouraging slaves to rebel -- and assaulting a white person with the intent to kill were punishable by death, serving as a deterrent for black people. Slaves were property with no rights and no chance of justice. They were subject to curfews, could not assemble without a white person present and were unable to testify or defend themselves in court.

John Sims: When you put "choice" in the context of the singular artist's mind, where creativity and freedom are untradable intangibles, we can see how someone like Kanye or a studied revolutionary or defiant poet can choose freedom in death over the servitude of bondage. And of course, they might be confused why everyone else is not following suit.

But in nature, the goal is to survive. So, if slavery is the alternative to the fear of death and mass extinction, then perhaps the "choice" of slavery was also the hope and anticipation of a future freedom -- as smart-surviving as a palm tree bending in the wind of a Category 5 hurricane.

With that in mind, we descendants of African slaves are indebted to the slaves who chose slavery over death in hope of a better day. Their pain and endurance is why we -- as a people -- are even still here. We are also indebted to those who chose death and the many, many nameless folks who ran away, fought back and died in divine acts of resistance. Their sacrifices are gifts of light in a time of great darkness, because their resistance was a reminder on the deepest level that slavery was wrong. And as we continue this journey out of darkness, we might ask ourselves another question:

Is liberation a choice?

Love: Liberation is a choice. Some people chose to navigate the system of slavery and stay alive. Some, like the Quilombos in Brazil and Gaspar Yanga in Mexico ran away, while others such as Joseph Cinqu- of the Amistad killed their captors. Others, such as 75 Nigerians at Igbo Landing off the Georgia coast took over their slave ship, drowning their kidnappers and ultimately themselves, choosing death over enslavement.

In that regard, Kanye spoke out of ignorance, as someone who is proud that he does not read books, and apparently does not know that black people fought and killed to be free.

History is replete with examples of just that. From Nat Turner and Denmark Vesey to the Haitian Revolution and the US Civil War, people of African descent have demonstrated their willingness to die in lieu of being kept alive to be violently oppressed.

Turner and his band of rebel slaves killed 51 white people in 1831. After being captured and hanged, he was reportedly skinned, and his body parts distributed as souvenirs to whites. States made it illegal for slaves to learn to read and write because Turner was literate.

The Civil War erupted only a few years after John Brown, a white man inspired by Nat Turner, raided the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry in an effort to arm a slave rebellion. Some 40,000 black soldiers died in that war -- some massacred after surrendering, as in the case of Fort Pillow.

Liberation was also a choice for my great-great-great grandparents, Clarissa and Daniel Whaley, who fled from a plantation in Pineville, South Carolina, to Charleston during the Civil War. According to my family's oral history, they escaped with a group of self-liberated black people across the river and through the swamps.

My great-great grandfather, Henry, was an infant wrapped in his mother Clarissa's apron, tied to her back. Henry cried out as the slave catchers -- the police, the ICE of their day -- approached. Clarissa had to decide whether to kill her baby to avoid attracting the patrols. Instead, she decided to breastfeed Henry, saving his and everyone's life. Clarissa chose liberation on her own terms, and I'm thankful for it.

Sims: In honor of those who have sacrificed their physical and cultural freedom before us, it is important to continue the journey of liberation and creative resistance. However black liberation is a gigantic project in progress.

If we want more of it, we must choose to continue the fight against police brutality, mass incarceration, and support black businesses, education, history, and culture -- not after we have been rejected and pounced upon, but before.

To do this, black people must critique the gravity of compliance and consumerism driven by capitalism, mind-altering marketing, corporate news, megachurches and generic mass education -- all of the mechanisms that shape independent thought.

I have tried to push against the aftermath of colonial slavery by using the art process as a tool for transformation and healing. In 2015, for the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War, I organized Confederate flag funerals all across the South. But after the horrific Charleston church shootings, I started a national call to burn and bury the Confederate flag every Memorial Day, not only to confront the trauma of Confederate and American slavery iconography but also as a way to honor the veterans of social justice who chose to speak up and push for change, equal rights and self liberation.

Whatever you may think of Kanye's comments, they got us talking about slavery, choices, freedom and resistance and how they relate. Now that the media dust has settled and the news have cycled elsewhere, we still must reckon with the continued rocky road to freedom and the intersecting matrices of collective and individual choices to move forward.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 319948

Reported Deaths: 7371
CountyCasesDeaths
DeSoto22285267
Hinds20719421
Harrison18431317
Rankin13901282
Jackson13718248
Madison10263224
Lee10059176
Jones8467167
Forrest7832153
Lauderdale7261242
Lowndes6517150
Lamar635188
Lafayette6313121
Washington5425137
Bolivar4841133
Panola4670110
Oktibbeha466198
Pearl River4605147
Marshall4574105
Warren4440121
Pontotoc425873
Monroe4157135
Union415777
Neshoba4063179
Lincoln4008112
Hancock386987
Leflore3515125
Tate342486
Sunflower339491
Pike3371111
Alcorn327272
Scott320374
Yazoo314171
Adams308086
Itawamba305178
Copiah299966
Coahoma298784
Simpson298589
Tippah291968
Prentiss284161
Leake272074
Marion271280
Covington267283
Wayne264642
Grenada264087
George252251
Newton248663
Tishomingo231868
Winston230181
Jasper222148
Attala215073
Chickasaw210559
Holmes190474
Stone188433
Clay187954
Tallahatchie180041
Clarke178980
Calhoun174132
Yalobusha167840
Smith164134
Walthall135347
Greene131834
Lawrence131124
Montgomery128643
Noxubee128034
Perry127238
Amite126242
Carroll122330
Webster115032
Jefferson Davis108234
Tunica108127
Claiborne103130
Benton102325
Humphreys97533
Kemper96629
Franklin85023
Quitman82216
Choctaw79118
Wilkinson69632
Jefferson66228
Sharkey50917
Issaquena1696
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 548657

Reported Deaths: 11306
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson810031566
Mobile42105831
Madison35690525
Tuscaloosa26173458
Shelby25607254
Montgomery25081614
Baldwin21868314
Lee16278176
Calhoun14719327
Morgan14629285
Etowah14175364
Marshall12453230
Houston10781287
Elmore10293214
Limestone10179157
St. Clair10162251
Cullman9952201
Lauderdale9603250
DeKalb8972190
Talladega8460184
Walker7338280
Autauga7241113
Blount6945139
Jackson6932113
Colbert6413140
Coffee5635127
Dale4928116
Russell454841
Chilton4476116
Franklin431382
Covington4275122
Tallapoosa4138155
Escambia401680
Chambers3728124
Dallas3607158
Clarke353061
Marion3240107
Pike314378
Lawrence3133100
Winston283472
Bibb268564
Geneva257981
Marengo250565
Pickens236962
Barbour234559
Hale227278
Butler224271
Fayette218862
Henry194543
Randolph187544
Cherokee187345
Monroe180041
Washington170539
Macon163051
Clay160059
Crenshaw155957
Cleburne153444
Lamar146837
Lowndes142254
Wilcox126930
Bullock124342
Conecuh113630
Coosa111729
Perry108626
Sumter105732
Greene93634
Choctaw62125
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Tropical Depression Claudette has now moved into Alabama and Georgia, leaving with some cloud cover but dry conditions. Most of us will stay dry through this Father's Day but some spotty showers will likely through the late afternoon.
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