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Space Shuttle Columbia Fast Facts

Here's a look at the Space Shuttle Columbia. ...

Posted: Jan 29, 2018 10:51 AM
Updated: Jan 29, 2018 10:52 AM

Here's a look at the Space Shuttle Columbia. On February 1, 2003, the Columbia broke up upon re-entry during mission STS-107, killing all seven crew members. It was the second loss of a shuttle in 113 shuttle flights.

Facts: Space Shuttle Columbia, the first reusable spacecraft, was the oldest in the shuttle fleet. It completed 27 missions; STS 107 was its 28th mission.

The Columbia Accident Investigation Board determined that the cause of the accident was a piece of insulating foam that broke off and struck a hole in the leading edge of the left wing less than two minutes into the flight.

The investigation into the cause of the break up cost over $400 million, involved more than 2,500 workers, and over 85,000 pieces of debris, equaling over 38% of the shuttle.

April 12-14, 1981 - STS-1 is the first space shuttle mission. The Columbia orbits Earth 37 times before landing.

The shuttle was called Columbia after the Columbia River which was named by boat captain Robert Gray in 1792.

The Crew of Mission STS 107: Michael Anderson, Payload Commander - December 25, 1959-February 1, 2003 (age 43). Born in Plattsburg, New York (but considered Spokane, Washington, his hometown), Anderson was a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Air Force and logged over 211 hours in space during his first space flight aboard the Shuttle Endeavour. He was the third African-American astronaut to die in the line of duty. He was survived by wife, Sandra, and two children.

David Brown, Mission Specialist - April 16, 1956-February 1, 2003 (age 46). Born in Arlington, Virginia. Brown was a Captain in the US Navy and a flight surgeon. He was selected for pilot training in 1988 and became a NASA astronaut in 1996. He had logged over 2,700 flight hours with 1,700 in high performance military aircraft.

Kalpana Chawla, Mission Specialist - July 1, 1961-February 1, 2003 (age 41). Born in Karnal, India, Chawla was the first native of India to fly in the US space shuttle and was one of the 6 astronaut crew that flew Columbia on its 24th flight in November-December 1997. She was survived by husband, Jean-Pierre Harrison.

Laurel Clark, Mission Specialist - March 10, 1961-February 1, 2003 (age 41). Born in Ames, Iowa (but considered Racine, Wisconsin, her hometown), Clark was a US Navy Captain and medical doctor. She joined NASA in 1996. She was survived by husband, Jonathan, and one child.

Rick Husband, Shuttle Commander - July 12, 1957-February 1, 2003 (age 45). Born in Amarillo, Texas, Husband was a Colonel in the US Air Force and logged over 3,800 hours of flight time in more than 40 different types of aircraft. He was survived by wife, Evelyn, and two children.

William "Willie" McCool, Shuttle Pilot - September 23, 1961-February 1, 2003 (age 41). Born in San Diego, California, McCool was a Commander in the US Navy and a graduate of the US Naval Academy. This was his first Shuttle mission. He was survived by wife Atilana and three children.

Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist - June 20, 1954-February 1, 2003 (age 48). Born in Tel Aviv, Israel, Ramon was the first Israeli Astronaut to fly aboard a space shuttle. He was survived by wife, Rona and four children.

Timeline: November 7, 1977 - Final assembly of the shuttle begins.

December 16, 1979 - The first orbiter integration test begins. It is completed on January 14, 1980.

March 1981 - Two workers are killed and four others are nearly asphyxiated in a nitrogen-filled compartment of the Columbia during a launch rehearsal.

April 1981 - The Columbia's first test launch is halted in the final seconds of countdown and is delayed for two days because of a software problem. Once it lifts off, everything works but the toilet, which becomes a chronic problem.

April 12, 1981 - Columbia becomes the first shuttle to orbit the earth.

December 8, 1983 - A small fire ignites on the US space shuttle Columbia during landing; no astronauts are injured.

August 1991 - After its 11th mission, Columbia is removed from the shuttle launch lineup to undergo inspection and retrofit at Rockwell International's Palmdale, California, assembly plant.

February 9, 1992 - The orbiter returns to the Kennedy Space Center after receiving 50 modifications, including the addition of carbon brakes, drag chute, improved nose wheel steering, removal of development flight instrumentation, and an enhancement of its thermal protection system.

June 25, 1992 - Columbia's first mission after its retrofit is STS-50. This is also the first ever extended-duration space shuttle mission.

October 8, 1994 - Columbia is transported to Palmdale, California, for its first Orbiter Maintenance Down Period (ODMP). This orbiter modification and refurbishment time is expected to take approximately six months.

April 4-8, 1997 - STS-83 is cut short by shuttle managers due to a problem with fuel cell No. 2, which displays evidence of internal voltage degradation after the launch.

July 1999 - During STS-93, Chandra X-Ray Observatory is placed in orbit.

September 24, 1999 - Columbia is transported to Palmdale, California, for its second ODMP. Workers perform more than 100 modifications on the vehicle.

March 1-12, 2002 - Columbia's flight, STS-109, is a servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope.

January 16, 2003 - Columbia lifts off from Kennedy Space Center.

February 1, 2003 - Columbia breaks up upon re-entry during mission STS-107, killing all seven members of the crew.

February 3, 2003 - A large section of the Columbia's cabin is found in eastern Texas.

March 20, 2003 - The electronic box containing vital information on the descent of the space shuttle is found intact in a field near Hemphill, Texas.

July 7, 2003 - During a test, a chunk of foam blows open a 16-inch hole in a mock-up of the shuttle wing. Investigators declare this the "smoking gun" that shows the Columbia crew flew their entire mission with a huge hole in their wing, causing the shuttle to break apart upon reentry.

August 26, 2003 - The Columbia Accident Investigation Board releases a report that says mistakes and organizational problems at NASA were partly to blame for the break-up of the shuttle. The report indicates that engineers recognized that when foam hit the shuttle's wings upon lift-off, the shuttle was in possibly grave danger, but management failed to take the incident seriously enough.

January 3, 2004 - NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit lands on MARS. The back of the spacecraft bears a plaque with the names of the seven Columbia astronauts written on it. The landing area is named the Columbia Memorial Station.

February 1, 2008 - A fifth anniversary memorial ceremony for the STS-107 astronauts is scheduled to be aired live on NASA-TV.

December 30, 2008 - NASA releases a 400-page report that states that helmets that did not conform to the head, failed seat restraints, and the lack of upper body restraints played a major role in the deaths of shuttle astronauts before the ship disintegrated. The report goes on to state that even if procedures and equipment had worked perfectly, the astronauts might have lived longer and been able to take more actions, but they still would not have survived.

August 2, 2011 - Debris from the shuttle is discovered in Texas, unearthed as the result of a drought.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 261167

Reported Deaths: 5713
CountyCasesDeaths
DeSoto17561191
Hinds16687329
Harrison14050202
Rankin11102217
Jackson10729188
Lee9014143
Madison8495168
Jones6607114
Forrest6135122
Lauderdale6067192
Lowndes5490120
Lafayette511794
Lamar499865
Washington4904125
Bolivar4087109
Oktibbeha403581
Panola380981
Pontotoc374757
Monroe3651106
Warren3649103
Union353263
Marshall352069
Neshoba3464154
Pearl River3422105
Leflore3090109
Lincoln304287
Sunflower290373
Hancock288461
Tate279062
Alcorn270754
Pike268180
Itawamba266662
Scott256048
Yazoo253756
Prentiss251153
Copiah247649
Tippah247550
Coahoma245954
Simpson241471
Leake236167
Grenada222471
Marion220273
Covington219072
Adams212370
Wayne208432
Winston205870
George203539
Newton197346
Attala196461
Tishomingo193861
Chickasaw188444
Jasper177838
Holmes171368
Clay164237
Tallahatchie155635
Stone149525
Clarke144762
Calhoun139922
Smith127725
Yalobusha121134
Walthall114037
Greene112929
Noxubee112225
Montgomery111236
Carroll106422
Lawrence105617
Perry104031
Amite100826
Webster95424
Tunica88221
Claiborne87825
Jefferson Davis87727
Benton84823
Humphreys84224
Kemper80020
Quitman7049
Franklin69617
Choctaw62513
Wilkinson59625
Jefferson56520
Sharkey44817
Issaquena1606
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 436087

Reported Deaths: 6486
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson63969994
Mobile31211565
Madison27851208
Tuscaloosa21233271
Montgomery19698326
Shelby19093130
Baldwin16981188
Lee13036105
Morgan12526134
Etowah11987179
Calhoun11441206
Marshall10357123
Houston8886158
Limestone827876
Cullman8203108
Elmore8120104
DeKalb7828103
Lauderdale7798103
St. Clair7763125
Talladega6394111
Walker6002177
Jackson594644
Colbert545276
Blount543986
Autauga532761
Coffee456762
Dale406883
Franklin372448
Russell349212
Chilton342873
Covington336068
Escambia330144
Dallas312096
Tallapoosa3120107
Chambers301170
Clarke293336
Pike261131
Marion251558
Lawrence250752
Winston232742
Bibb221248
Geneva208746
Marengo206529
Pickens199031
Hale182742
Barbour179337
Fayette177029
Butler172459
Cherokee164330
Henry158224
Monroe151320
Randolph144336
Washington140127
Clay129146
Crenshaw122944
Macon120937
Cleburne120724
Lamar119721
Lowndes113736
Wilcox106622
Bullock102228
Perry99118
Conecuh96821
Sumter90026
Greene76823
Coosa63215
Choctaw51724
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