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Space Shuttle Columbia Fast Facts

Here's a look at the Space Shuttle Columbia. ...

Posted: Jan 29, 2018 10:51 AM
Updated: Jan 29, 2018 10:52 AM

Here's a look at the Space Shuttle Columbia. On February 1, 2003, the Columbia broke up upon re-entry during mission STS-107, killing all seven crew members. It was the second loss of a shuttle in 113 shuttle flights.

Facts: Space Shuttle Columbia, the first reusable spacecraft, was the oldest in the shuttle fleet. It completed 27 missions; STS 107 was its 28th mission.

The Columbia Accident Investigation Board determined that the cause of the accident was a piece of insulating foam that broke off and struck a hole in the leading edge of the left wing less than two minutes into the flight.

The investigation into the cause of the break up cost over $400 million, involved more than 2,500 workers, and over 85,000 pieces of debris, equaling over 38% of the shuttle.

April 12-14, 1981 - STS-1 is the first space shuttle mission. The Columbia orbits Earth 37 times before landing.

The shuttle was called Columbia after the Columbia River which was named by boat captain Robert Gray in 1792.

The Crew of Mission STS 107: Michael Anderson, Payload Commander - December 25, 1959-February 1, 2003 (age 43). Born in Plattsburg, New York (but considered Spokane, Washington, his hometown), Anderson was a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Air Force and logged over 211 hours in space during his first space flight aboard the Shuttle Endeavour. He was the third African-American astronaut to die in the line of duty. He was survived by wife, Sandra, and two children.

David Brown, Mission Specialist - April 16, 1956-February 1, 2003 (age 46). Born in Arlington, Virginia. Brown was a Captain in the US Navy and a flight surgeon. He was selected for pilot training in 1988 and became a NASA astronaut in 1996. He had logged over 2,700 flight hours with 1,700 in high performance military aircraft.

Kalpana Chawla, Mission Specialist - July 1, 1961-February 1, 2003 (age 41). Born in Karnal, India, Chawla was the first native of India to fly in the US space shuttle and was one of the 6 astronaut crew that flew Columbia on its 24th flight in November-December 1997. She was survived by husband, Jean-Pierre Harrison.

Laurel Clark, Mission Specialist - March 10, 1961-February 1, 2003 (age 41). Born in Ames, Iowa (but considered Racine, Wisconsin, her hometown), Clark was a US Navy Captain and medical doctor. She joined NASA in 1996. She was survived by husband, Jonathan, and one child.

Rick Husband, Shuttle Commander - July 12, 1957-February 1, 2003 (age 45). Born in Amarillo, Texas, Husband was a Colonel in the US Air Force and logged over 3,800 hours of flight time in more than 40 different types of aircraft. He was survived by wife, Evelyn, and two children.

William "Willie" McCool, Shuttle Pilot - September 23, 1961-February 1, 2003 (age 41). Born in San Diego, California, McCool was a Commander in the US Navy and a graduate of the US Naval Academy. This was his first Shuttle mission. He was survived by wife Atilana and three children.

Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist - June 20, 1954-February 1, 2003 (age 48). Born in Tel Aviv, Israel, Ramon was the first Israeli Astronaut to fly aboard a space shuttle. He was survived by wife, Rona and four children.

Timeline: November 7, 1977 - Final assembly of the shuttle begins.

December 16, 1979 - The first orbiter integration test begins. It is completed on January 14, 1980.

March 1981 - Two workers are killed and four others are nearly asphyxiated in a nitrogen-filled compartment of the Columbia during a launch rehearsal.

April 1981 - The Columbia's first test launch is halted in the final seconds of countdown and is delayed for two days because of a software problem. Once it lifts off, everything works but the toilet, which becomes a chronic problem.

April 12, 1981 - Columbia becomes the first shuttle to orbit the earth.

December 8, 1983 - A small fire ignites on the US space shuttle Columbia during landing; no astronauts are injured.

August 1991 - After its 11th mission, Columbia is removed from the shuttle launch lineup to undergo inspection and retrofit at Rockwell International's Palmdale, California, assembly plant.

February 9, 1992 - The orbiter returns to the Kennedy Space Center after receiving 50 modifications, including the addition of carbon brakes, drag chute, improved nose wheel steering, removal of development flight instrumentation, and an enhancement of its thermal protection system.

June 25, 1992 - Columbia's first mission after its retrofit is STS-50. This is also the first ever extended-duration space shuttle mission.

October 8, 1994 - Columbia is transported to Palmdale, California, for its first Orbiter Maintenance Down Period (ODMP). This orbiter modification and refurbishment time is expected to take approximately six months.

April 4-8, 1997 - STS-83 is cut short by shuttle managers due to a problem with fuel cell No. 2, which displays evidence of internal voltage degradation after the launch.

July 1999 - During STS-93, Chandra X-Ray Observatory is placed in orbit.

September 24, 1999 - Columbia is transported to Palmdale, California, for its second ODMP. Workers perform more than 100 modifications on the vehicle.

March 1-12, 2002 - Columbia's flight, STS-109, is a servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope.

January 16, 2003 - Columbia lifts off from Kennedy Space Center.

February 1, 2003 - Columbia breaks up upon re-entry during mission STS-107, killing all seven members of the crew.

February 3, 2003 - A large section of the Columbia's cabin is found in eastern Texas.

March 20, 2003 - The electronic box containing vital information on the descent of the space shuttle is found intact in a field near Hemphill, Texas.

July 7, 2003 - During a test, a chunk of foam blows open a 16-inch hole in a mock-up of the shuttle wing. Investigators declare this the "smoking gun" that shows the Columbia crew flew their entire mission with a huge hole in their wing, causing the shuttle to break apart upon reentry.

August 26, 2003 - The Columbia Accident Investigation Board releases a report that says mistakes and organizational problems at NASA were partly to blame for the break-up of the shuttle. The report indicates that engineers recognized that when foam hit the shuttle's wings upon lift-off, the shuttle was in possibly grave danger, but management failed to take the incident seriously enough.

January 3, 2004 - NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit lands on MARS. The back of the spacecraft bears a plaque with the names of the seven Columbia astronauts written on it. The landing area is named the Columbia Memorial Station.

February 1, 2008 - A fifth anniversary memorial ceremony for the STS-107 astronauts is scheduled to be aired live on NASA-TV.

December 30, 2008 - NASA releases a 400-page report that states that helmets that did not conform to the head, failed seat restraints, and the lack of upper body restraints played a major role in the deaths of shuttle astronauts before the ship disintegrated. The report goes on to state that even if procedures and equipment had worked perfectly, the astronauts might have lived longer and been able to take more actions, but they still would not have survived.

August 2, 2011 - Debris from the shuttle is discovered in Texas, unearthed as the result of a drought.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 516486

Reported Deaths: 10299
CountyCasesDeaths
Harrison35042558
DeSoto33463432
Hinds32797643
Jackson24926392
Rankin22593405
Lee16523245
Madison14978283
Jones14191248
Forrest13852260
Lauderdale12326323
Lowndes11387193
Lamar10713140
Pearl River9759244
Lafayette8881143
Hancock7848132
Washington7561169
Oktibbeha7234138
Monroe7091179
Pontotoc7060110
Warren6892178
Panola6807135
Neshoba6753210
Marshall6735142
Bolivar6472151
Union645699
Alcorn5950108
Pike5947157
Lincoln5544136
George511080
Prentiss510185
Tippah497983
Itawamba4903107
Scott479499
Tate4786118
Adams4784125
Leflore4756144
Yazoo458492
Copiah458395
Simpson4577117
Wayne443772
Covington435395
Sunflower4331106
Marion4311112
Coahoma4259110
Leake414491
Newton396182
Tishomingo388894
Grenada3796109
Stone366466
Attala341690
Jasper341566
Chickasaw319167
Winston318892
Clay313978
Clarke301995
Calhoun288950
Holmes273389
Smith270852
Yalobusha245847
Tallahatchie232653
Greene225449
Walthall222166
Lawrence220842
Perry214656
Amite210357
Webster206748
Noxubee188843
Montgomery182757
Carroll175841
Jefferson Davis174643
Tunica163939
Benton153439
Kemper145541
Choctaw137827
Claiborne134839
Humphreys132339
Franklin126630
Quitman107928
Wilkinson106139
Jefferson97334
Sharkey65321
Issaquena1957
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 848779

Reported Deaths: 16185
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson1164582005
Mobile744601384
Madison53563738
Shelby38454371
Baldwin38215589
Tuscaloosa36172644
Montgomery34573782
Lee25690264
Calhoun22636520
Morgan22548411
Etowah20075520
Marshall18865318
Houston17795426
St. Clair16968359
Limestone16206220
Cullman16170306
Elmore15952295
Lauderdale15093307
Talladega14267302
DeKalb13095271
Walker12180380
Blount10791193
Autauga10562157
Jackson10221196
Coffee9440192
Colbert9376210
Dale9049192
Tallapoosa7287202
Russell711465
Chilton7098170
Covington6973197
Escambia6969144
Franklin6369108
Chambers5810142
Marion5446132
Dallas5306210
Pike5135109
Clarke486086
Lawrence4852130
Winston4804110
Geneva4656136
Bibb436495
Barbour370880
Butler3445101
Marengo342993
Monroe338566
Randolph338067
Pickens335090
Fayette332285
Henry321266
Cherokee320564
Hale319589
Crenshaw261878
Washington256852
Cleburne255460
Lamar253555
Clay253169
Macon246367
Conecuh193562
Coosa186048
Wilcox178538
Lowndes178468
Bullock152845
Perry141940
Sumter139841
Greene130745
Choctaw94628
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