Jeff Sessions Fast Facts

Here's a look at the life of Jeff Sessions, former US attorney general and former Republican senator of Alab...

Posted: Nov 8, 2018 8:49 AM
Updated: Nov 8, 2018 8:49 AM

Here's a look at the life of Jeff Sessions, former US attorney general and former Republican senator of Alabama.

Personal:
Birth date: December 24, 1946

Fast Facts

Jeff Sessions

Political Figures - US

2016 Presidential election

Alabama

Donald Trump

Elections and campaigns

Government and public administration

Immigration

Immigration, citizenship and displacement

International relations and national security

North America

Political candidates

Politics

Southeastern United States

United States

US Congress

US Federal elections

US Presidential elections

US Senate

Government bodies and offices

Justice departments

Eastern Europe

Europe

Russia

Investigations

Russia meddling investigation

US Department of Justice

US federal departments and agencies

US federal government

Crime, law enforcement and corrections

Criminal law

Law and legal system

White House

Continents and regions

Elections (by type)

Government departments and authorities

Government organizations - US

The Americas

Birth place: Selma, Alabama

Birth name: Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III

Father: Jefferson Beauregard Sessions Jr., business owner

Mother: Abbie (Powe) Sessions

Marriage: Mary Blackshear Sessions (1969-present)

Children: Mary Abigail, Ruth and Samuel

Education: Huntingdon College, B.A., 1969; University of Alabama, J.D., 1973

Military service: US Army Reserve, 1973-1986, Captain

Religion: Methodist

Other Facts:
Is an Eagle Scout.

Served on the Senate Budget, Judiciary, Armed Services, and Environment and Public Works Committees.

Voted against both of President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nominees, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.

Supported building fencing along the US border, saying in 2006 that "good fences make good neighbors."

Was opponent of the 2013 "Gang of Eight" immigration reform bill.

Timeline:
1973-1975 - Practices law in Alabama.

1975-1977 - Assistant US Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama.

1981-1993 - US Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama.

1986 - President Ronald Reagan nominates Sessions to become a federal judge. The Senate Judiciary Committee opposes the nomination following testimony that Sessions made racist remarks and called the NAACP and ACLU "un-American."

1995-1997- Alabama Attorney General. During this time, an Alabama judge accuses Sessions of prosecutorial misconduct related to the handling of evidence in a case but ultimately, Sessions is not disciplined for ethics violations.

1996 - Elected to the US Senate. Re-elected in 2002, 2008 and 2014.

1997-February 2017 - Republican senator representing Alabama.

February 2, 2009 - Votes in favor of the confirmation of Eric Holder as attorney general.

April 23, 2015 - Votes against the confirmation of Loretta Lynch as attorney general.

February 28, 2016 - Becomes the first sitting US senator to endorse Donald Trump's presidential bid.

November 18, 2016 - President-elect Trump announces he intends to nominate Sessions to be the next attorney general.

January 3, 2017 - An NAACP sit-in to protest the nomination of Sessions as US attorney general ends when six people are arrested at Sessions' Mobile, Alabama, office.

February 8, 2017 - After 30 hours of debate, the US Senate confirms Sessions as attorney general by a 52-47 vote.

March 1, 2017 - The Washington Post reports that Sessions failed to disclose pre-election meetings with the top Russian diplomat in Washington. Sessions did not mention either meeting during his confirmation hearings when he said he knew of no contacts between Trump surrogates and Russians.

March 2, 2017 - Sessions recuses himself from any involvement in a Justice Department probe into links between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

March 10, 2017 - The DOJ abruptly announces the firing of 46 US attorneys, including Preet Bharara of New York. Bharara said that during the transition, Trump asked him to stay on during a meeting at Trump Tower.

April 3, 2017 - The Department of Justice releases a memorandum ordering a review of consent decrees and other police reforms overseen by the federal government in response to complaints of civil rights abuses and public safety issues. During his confirmation hearing, Sessions expressed skepticism about the effectiveness of Justice Department interventions in local police matters.

July 21, 2017 - The Washington Post reports that Sessions discussed policy-related matters with Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak before the 2016 election, according to intelligence intercepts. Sessions had previously claimed that he did not talk about the campaign or relations with Russia during his meetings with Kislyak.

October 4, 2017 - In a memo to all federal prosecutors, Sessions says that a 1964 federal civil rights law does not protect transgender workers from employment discrimination and the department will take this new position in all "pending and future matters."

November 14, 2017 - During a House judiciary committee hearing, Sessions says he did not lie under oath in earlier hearings regarding communications with Russians during the 2016 presidential campaign, and denies participating in any collusion with Russia. Sessions also says the DOJ will consider investigations into Hillary Clinton and alleged ties between the Clinton Foundation and the sale of Uranium One.

January 4, 2018 - Sessions announces that the DOJ is rescinding an Obama-era policy of non-interference with states that have legalized recreational marijuana. The reversal frees up federal prosecutors to pursue cases in states where recreational marijuana is legal.

March 21, 2018 - Sessions issues a statement encouraging federal prosecutors to seek the death penalty for certain drug-related crimes, as mandated by law. Seeking capital punishment in drug cases is part of the Trump administration's efforts to combat opioid abuse.

May 7, 2018 - Sessions announces a "zero tolerance" policy for illegal border crossings, warning that parents could be separated from children if they try to cross to the United States from Mexico. "If you cross the border unlawfully, even a first offense, we're going to prosecute you. If you're smuggling a child, we're going to prosecute you, and that child will be separated from you, probably, as required by law. If you don't want your child to be separated, then don't bring them across the border illegally." On June 20, Trump signs an executive order that will keep far more families together at the border.

May 30, 2018 - Trump again expresses regret for choosing Sessions to lead the Justice Department. In a tweet, he quotes a remark from Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) who said that the president could have picked someone else as attorney general. "I wish I did!," Trump tweeted. He had first said that he was rethinking his choice of Sessions as attorney general during a July 2017 interview with the New York Times.

June 2018 - More than 600 members of the United Methodist Church issue a formal complaint against Sessions, arguing that the US government's "zero tolerance" policy on immigration, which was separating migrant parents from their children at the US-Mexico border, violates church rules and may constitute child abuse. On August 8, church officials confirm that the charges filed against Sessions have been dropped.

August 23, 2018 - In response to Trump saying during a Fox News interview that Sessions "never took control" of the Justice Department, Sessions issues a rare statement, saying, "I took control of the Department of Justice the day I was sworn in...While I am Attorney General, the actions of the Department of Justice will not be improperly influenced by political considerations..."

November 7, 2018 - President Trump asks Sessions to resign, effectively firing him. "At your request I am submitting my resignation," Sessions writes in a letter delivered to White House chief of staff John Kelly.

Mississippi Coronavirus Cases

Data is updated nightly.

Cases: 308737

Reported Deaths: 7139
CountyCasesDeaths
DeSoto20931250
Hinds19961410
Harrison17562303
Rankin13369277
Jackson13156243
Madison9950212
Lee9890170
Jones8310161
Forrest7542148
Lauderdale7221237
Lowndes6289144
Lamar613384
Lafayette6072117
Washington5291133
Bolivar4776129
Oktibbeha457197
Panola4458103
Pearl River4437141
Warren4299119
Marshall4286102
Pontotoc417572
Monroe4062132
Union404675
Neshoba4005176
Lincoln3886109
Hancock373385
Leflore3471124
Sunflower331589
Tate325384
Pike3215105
Scott311472
Yazoo305069
Alcorn299465
Itawamba297877
Copiah293965
Coahoma290479
Simpson289586
Tippah285168
Prentiss276659
Marion266279
Leake261773
Wayne261541
Grenada256484
Covington255280
Adams246982
Newton245761
George238547
Winston226081
Tishomingo222567
Jasper220048
Attala213673
Chickasaw205457
Holmes187172
Clay183254
Stone179733
Clarke177776
Tallahatchie176140
Calhoun165431
Yalobusha160136
Smith159334
Walthall131043
Greene129633
Lawrence126623
Noxubee126534
Montgomery125742
Perry125238
Carroll120926
Amite120741
Webster113832
Jefferson Davis105532
Tunica103225
Claiborne101330
Benton97525
Kemper95628
Humphreys94632
Franklin82923
Quitman78916
Choctaw73917
Wilkinson65128
Jefferson64828
Sharkey49817
Issaquena1686
Unassigned00

Alabama Coronavirus Cases

Cases: 521623

Reported Deaths: 10739
CountyCasesDeaths
Jefferson754061493
Mobile39067799
Madison34040496
Tuscaloosa25367444
Montgomery24019567
Shelby23186239
Baldwin20701302
Lee15589165
Calhoun14342311
Morgan14158271
Etowah13685346
Marshall11995220
Houston10404278
Elmore10011200
Limestone9852147
Cullman9503189
St. Clair9463234
Lauderdale9265228
DeKalb8757181
Talladega8115171
Walker7139275
Jackson6756110
Autauga6750103
Blount6519134
Colbert6229130
Coffee5424113
Dale4772111
Russell430038
Franklin420782
Chilton4101109
Covington4061114
Tallapoosa3907146
Escambia390174
Dallas3525149
Chambers3514122
Clarke347060
Marion3072100
Pike306176
Lawrence295995
Winston273172
Bibb256059
Marengo248361
Geneva246075
Pickens233259
Barbour226455
Hale218575
Butler212967
Fayette209460
Henry188044
Cherokee182644
Randolph177241
Monroe172540
Washington165238
Macon155648
Clay150155
Crenshaw149457
Cleburne146741
Lamar139734
Lowndes136553
Wilcox124427
Bullock121640
Conecuh109428
Perry107626
Sumter103232
Coosa99428
Greene91434
Choctaw58824
Out of AL00
Unassigned00
Tupelo
Cloudy
64° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 55°
Feels Like: 64°
Columbus
Mostly Cloudy
62° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 56°
Feels Like: 62°
Oxford
Cloudy
59° wxIcon
Hi: 65° Lo: 52°
Feels Like: 59°
Starkville
Mostly Cloudy
63° wxIcon
Hi: 69° Lo: 54°
Feels Like: 63°
Some spotty showers will move through our area this morning but should clear out by the afternoon. We should see some breaks in the clouds and temperatures reaching the mid to upper 60s.
WTVA Radar
WTVA Temperatures
WTVA Severe Weather